Win95 partition --> a Linux native partition

Win95 partition --> a Linux native partition

Post by Smit » Wed, 07 Jan 1998 04:00:00



I was wondering whether it is possible to convert  a Win95 partition
to a  Linux native partition, and then incorporate the new partition
into the partition for "/usr/src" or "/usr/local" since my partitions
for those are all full.

Thanks a lot.

 
 
 

Win95 partition --> a Linux native partition

Post by David L. Johnso » Wed, 07 Jan 1998 04:00:00



> I was wondering whether it is possible to convert  a Win95 partition
> to a  Linux native partition, and then incorporate the new partition
> into the partition for "/usr/src" or "/usr/local" since my partitions
> for those are all full.

This is what I like to see!  Yes, you can get rid of that Windows partition
and make it a linux partition.  Your computer will run better, too.  Use fdisk
to change the partition's type (from VFAT or whatever to linux native), then
use mke2fs to format it as an ext2 filesystem.  Easily done.  Be sure to keep
aware of what partition you are dealing with.

Now, as for using this to increase the size of existing partitions, that is
not (as of yet) possible.  What you can do, though, is to:

1)  mount your new partition on an empty directory.  Many distributions create
a directory /mnt for just this purpose.  To do that, if your new partition is
/dev/hda1, say, do "mount -t ext2 /dev/hda1 /mnt".  

2) Then, choose one of the branches of your current file structure on the
already full partition, and copy it all to /mnt, by (say, if /usr/foo is a big
part of the partition mounted on /usr that is full) "cp -R /usr/foo /mnt".  

3) Now things get tricky.  Did I tell you to back everything up?  After you do
that, delete everthing in /usr/foo.  Then, edit your /etc/fstab file to have a
line like

/dev/hda1   /usr/foo  ext2    defaults      0   2

Of course, if your partition was something else, use that....  Also, make sure
you delete everything in the old /usr/foo -- but don't delete the directory.
That is your new "mount point" for that new partition.

Let's see, did I forget anything?  I don't think so.  Reboot, and your old
stuff should be on the new partition.  

--


Department of Mathematics               http://www.lehigh.edu/~dlj0/dlj0.html
Lehigh University
14 E. Packer Avenue                     (610) 758-3759
Bethlehem, PA 18015-3174

 
 
 

Win95 partition --> a Linux native partition

Post by Tim » Wed, 07 Jan 1998 04:00:00



Quote:> I was wondering whether it is possible to convert  a Win95 partition
> to a  Linux native partition, and then incorporate the new partition
> into the partition for "/usr/src" or "/usr/local" since my partitions
> for those are all full.

Sure. Just use fdisk to change the partition type to 0x83, and e2fsck it.
Then mount as needed (adding the appropriate entry to /etc/fstab).

--
nospam is a valid user at my domain, but is infrequently checked and
heavily filtered. Use "tsweeney" at the same domain for direct access.
Powered by Linux (since 1992), FreeBSD (since 1996) and NT (since I can't
find anything else to play Diablo on).

 
 
 

Win95 partition --> a Linux native partition

Post by Bryan Cha » Fri, 09 Jan 1998 04:00:00



> 2) Then, choose one of the branches of your current file structure on the
> already full partition, and copy it all to /mnt, by (say, if /usr/foo is a big
> part of the partition mounted on /usr that is full) "cp -R /usr/foo /mnt".

This will probably not work as expected; "cp -R" will follow links and
behave strangely. It will loop infinitely and fill up /mnt if there is a
recursive symbolic link. Try "cp -dpR" instead.

But the method I always use for this purpose is:

  cd /usr/foo ; find . | cpio -pdmu /mnt

Bryan Chan______________________________________________________________


              http://www-ug.eecg.toronto.edu/~chanb/

 
 
 

1. Installing Linux native partition over DOS Extented partition?

I have a hopefully simple question about creating a linux partition on
my harddrive.  

       I have a primary c: partition ocuppying the first 250 MB of my
disk.  The remaining 777MB were used as an extended DOS partition with
three logical partitions (d:, e:, f:).  After reading all related
documentation that I could find, I deleted the last logical partition
(f:) and then recreated f: to be 100MB smaller, freeing this space for
my linux partition.  I then booted linux and the RedHat install
program from floppy.  The system acknowledges all of my hardware and
asks if I would like to partition the HD.  After creating a linux
partition in the remaining 100MB (which is still part of my DOS
extended partition), the program did'nt like this and aborted.

      Can I place a linux partition into an extended DOS partition?
My problem is that now DOS fdisk interprets the last 100MB of the
extended partition as full, and will not allow me to reinstall my
original f: drive.  Trying to delete the partition using linux fdisk
causes a warning message saying to read 'the manual' ( which manual
it's refering to I don't know.)  

Thanks in advance for any advice (give up!) or suggestions.

Chris Lemper
Department of Geosciences
Princeton University
Princeton, NJ 08540


2. kppp problem

3. Performance of native FreeBSD partition vs FAT32 partition on FreeBSD 3.2-STABLE

4. How to cp ln to another directory

5. root partition to a unix native partition

6. getting rayshade4.0 to compile on rs6k

7. Questions: Large SCSI Partitions, native SCSI partitioning

8. Is this system supported?

9. Making linux partition when a FAT32 (win95) partition exists.

10. How to add new Native native partition

11. Problems with Win95 partition lying behind Linux partition

12. WANTED : Utility to copy file from Dos Partition (Win95) to Linux Partition

13. <><><> MOUNTING EXTENDED PARTITION <><><>