screen resolution

screen resolution

Post by John Brashie » Tue, 03 Aug 1999 04:00:00



I am trying to discover how to reset the screen resolution.
I know about the CTRL ALT +,- option, but I want to
completely reset the number of colors. The mouseconfig
takes you back to the part of the setup for the mouse. Am
I looking for something similar for the screen settings?
Any help is welcome.

Thanks,
John Brashier

 
 
 

screen resolution

Post by John Brashie » Tue, 03 Aug 1999 04:00:00


Mann,

Thanks. That was exactly the ticket.

Brashier

 
 
 

screen resolution

Post by Howard Man » Wed, 04 Aug 1999 04:00:00


[Foolow-ups to c.o.l.s]



Quote:> I am trying to discover how to reset the screen resolution.
> I know about the CTRL ALT +,- option, but I want to
> completely reset the number of colors. The mouseconfig
> takes you back to the part of the setup for the mouse. Am
> I looking for something similar for the screen settings?
> Any help is welcome.

The issue of color depth in the X-window server is well articulated in
 this source available online:

http://www.suse.de/Support/sdb_e/maddin_bpp.html

Stipulate a fixed color depth by editing the relevant section of
 the XF86Config file.

Regards,

--
Howard Mann
http://www.newbielinux.com  
(a LINUX website for newbies)
Smart Linuxers search at: http://www.deja.com/home_ps.shtml

 
 
 

screen resolution

Post by David Pac » Sat, 07 Aug 1999 04:00:00



> I am trying to discover how to reset the screen resolution.
> I know about the CTRL ALT +,- option, but I want to
> completely reset the number of colors. The mouseconfig
> takes you back to the part of the setup for the mouse. Am
> I looking for something similar for the screen settings?
> Any help is welcome.

> Thanks,
> John Brashier

Xconfigurator
and XF86Setup
are used for this.

But, I found the best success
editing /etc/XF86Config directly.

Section "Screen"
needs a line (four lines down):

DefaultColourDepth 16

to indicate the number of colours.

David Pace

--
Free commodity/stock graphing software
and Linux links at http://www.daveware.com

 
 
 

screen resolution

Post by Vince Veselosk » Mon, 09 Aug 1999 04:00:00




>> I am trying to discover how to reset the screen resolution.
>> I know about the CTRL ALT +,- option, but I want to
>> completely reset the number of colors. The mouseconfig
>> takes you back to the part of the setup for the mouse. Am
>> I looking for something similar for the screen settings?
>> Any help is welcome.

>> Thanks,
>> John Brashier

> Xconfigurator
> and XF86Setup
> are used for this.

> But, I found the best success
> editing /etc/XF86Config directly.

> Section "Screen"
> needs a line (four lines down):

> DefaultColourDepth 16

> to indicate the number of colours.

> David Pace

> --
> Free commodity/stock graphing software
> and Linux links at http://www.daveware.com

Also, if you just want to change it for this session without changing
the defaults, you can pass it as a parameter to the X server:

startx -- -bpp 16

Vince V.

--
Control-Escape: Alternative Software
Linux help for beginners to advanced users.
http://www.control-escape.com/

 
 
 

1. Changing screen resolution AND virtual resolution?

Hi,
Does someone know if it is (or is not!) possible to change both the
screen resolution AND the virtual screen resolution at the same time
with the Ctrl+Alt+Keypad-Plus/Ctrl+Alt+Keypad-Minus keystrokes? I
typically run at 1024x768 but would like to be able to change to 800x600
or 600x480, but without getting the "scrolling" virtual screen as a side
effect.
Any ideas?
Thanks in advance,
Max.

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