pppoe, ethernet, westell wirespeed, SBC, DSL, SuSE support

pppoe, ethernet, westell wirespeed, SBC, DSL, SuSE support

Post by galleysa » Wed, 17 Jul 2002 17:09:28



My PC has pppoe software, a Realteck RTL8139 NIC, connected to a Westell
Wirespeed modem, connected to a DSL phone jack, connected to SBC, which is
connected to the internet.  I've installed SuSE and it's working as a
standalone Unix, dual-booted with Windows ME.

SBC normally has good tech support, but they are VERY clear they won't have
anything to do with supporting Linux.

I got SuSE mostly because they offer phone support as part of their
package.  I even tested the phone support before buying SuSE, calling the
number to see how long it took to get a human being on the line (response
was immediate.  Impressive!)  I was especially concerned about the critical
blackout period
where I've installed Unix but have not yet brought up internet
communications.  I was confident that Unix would work once installed, the
main glitch I was worried about, the main worry, was connecting the thing to
the internet without any support from my ISP.

I read the entire manuals that came with SuSE before attempting
installation.  OK, I skipped over some stuff, like how to do Word
processing, but I read all the installation stuff.

Well, I'm still blacked out.  I'm sending this via a reboot to Windoze.
I've tested all my devices, Unix is up and working fine, better than I
expected (my 100 Mb USB zip seems to be working while the SuSE website said
it wouldn't).  I've tested it pretty thoroughly.

Someone, an SBC user, told me privately that SuSE would give me a simple
menu
to configure my DSL with and that would be it.  The menu turned out to be
indeed quite simple, exactly as he described it, so much so that I'm sure I
filled it out accurately, but that wasn't it.  My DSL is not connected.
When I do

ping 1.1.1.1

it responds with

connect: network is unreachable

Just for good measure, I tried

ping 0.0.0.0

which responds with a line after line of responses like

PING 0.0.0.0 (127.0.0.1) from 127.0.0.1 : 56(84) bytes of data.  64 bytes
from 127.0.0.1 icmp_seq=1 ttl=255 time=0.040 ms

repeatedly, with times ranging from 0.034 ms to 0.040 ms.

(I think that's it, I wrote it down on a piece of paper so I could type it
in after rebooting to windoze).  Anyway, that looks to me like the machine
just pings itself when you give it 0.0.0.0.  "man ping" was of no help, it
says there is a "destination" field for "ping", but does not define its
behavior, and I am not a "ping" expert.
It would be good if I knew of a static IP address of a machine that I could
count on being there to ping.  If I just copy an IP address from an email
header, it might be dynamic and not there anymore, giving confusing results.

As further evidence that I am not on the internet, I went into the web
browser (in this case Konqueror) and tried to bring up http://cnn.com and it
said

An error occurred while loading http://cnn.com
Unknown host cnn.com

So either Cable News Network crashes every time I go onto Unix and comes
back when I boot back to windoze, or my Unix isn't connecting to DSL.

So I gather my DSL is not connected.

When I called SuSE's much vaunted installation support for help with my DSL,
I got a human being on the line right away (hooray) but the good news ended
there.  They told me DSL support was "advanced support", that it would cost
me about $40, and more importantly that no one currently present could
provide it and I should call back tomorrow (no guarantee was made that
anyone qualified would be on hand tomorrow, nor any prediction of when I
could rely on such a source being available).  I said Oh.

I experimented with Kmail, tried to configure it and was confused (the
manual is pretty vague), I called SuSE again saying I had an e-mail problem
and the story was similar, they say e-mail was an advanced topic, that it
would cost.  I asked if the support doesn't include e-mail support what DOES
it include?  The guy didn't answer that directly, he just said to e-mail in
my request for support, because some topics are supported by e-mail but not
by phone, but he wouldn't define which were which.  I sent in an e-mail,
we'll see if I get anything back.

Every ISP I've ever had was willing to hold my hand through setting up
e-mail.  I know it's not rocket science, but that's one of the most basic
things that customer support can possibly do.  What can the SuSE support
people do, then?  Teach me Unix?  I don't need that!  I've spent 9 years of
my life banging applications code on Unix machines with systems
administrators taking care of me, it's the networking and administration
where I need some help now.

It looks like they've got me where they want me.  I don't really see a more
attractive alternative to paying the $40 for DSL support and hoping that
fixes it and the e-mail problem either goes away or can be remedied via
e-mail from windoze.

It reminds me of a story that I heard about when Chinese prospectors were
traveling by ship to Australia to dig for gold over a century ago, they
couldn't swim, and the (Australian or British) ship would drop anchor off
Robe, South Australia, a few hundred yards off the shore, and inform the
Chinese that being ferried those last few hundred yards in a rowboat was
going to cost them twice the fare they had already paid for the thousands of
miles they had come from China.  (OK, this isn't quite as bad as that, but
the principle is the same).

 
 
 

pppoe, ethernet, westell wirespeed, SBC, DSL, SuSE support

Post by Marco Sha » Wed, 17 Jul 2002 19:00:36


Quote:> connected to the internet.  I've installed SuSE and it's working as a
> standalone Unix, dual-booted with Windows ME.

Just a clarification...  SuSe is not Unix, it's Linux.

Quote:> When I do

> ping 1.1.1.1

> it responds with

> connect: network is unreachable

I suspect your gateway isn't getting populated:


Kernel IP routing table
Destination     Gateway         Genmask         Flags   MSS Window  irtt
Iface
142.166.182.6   0.0.0.0         255.255.255.255 UH       40 0          0
ppp0
127.0.0.0       0.0.0.0         255.0.0.0       U        40 0          0
lo
0.0.0.0         142.166.182.6   0.0.0.0         UG       40 0          0
ppp0

The last line tells all my packets where they should go to (that's what
"G" in the "Flags" column indicates: "gateway"), then that device is
smarter and knows better how/where to route packets.  Try that command
before and after launching PPPoE, if it doesn't seem to change that's
your problem.  Some PPPoE packages offer you the option to change your
default gateway, and some won't change it if they already see one
configured.

If you have to do it manually, you need to find out the IP address of
your PPPoE server, which may get printed out in /var/log/messages or
similar upon connecting, then you can try:

#route add default gw IP_address_of_PPPoE_server

Marco

 
 
 

pppoe, ethernet, westell wirespeed, SBC, DSL, SuSE support

Post by Bill Chapma » Thu, 18 Jul 2002 00:40:17


My problem has been solved, I am writing this from Linux.

I hadn't used Roaring Penguin because I got the impression from SuSE
that the SuSE install was taking care of all that, and I was worried the
two tools might interfere with each other.  Finally, I just downloaded
the rp tar file, built the executables and installed them, it guided me
through the installation telling me exactly what information I needed
from my ISP, put in a firewall, and that's it.  I'm on the internet.
I'm gonna send Roaring Penguin their recommended $20 "donation" because
they've earned it.


> My PC has pppoe software, a Realteck RTL8139 NIC, connected to a Westell
> Wirespeed modem, connected to a DSL phone jack, connected to SBC, which is
> connected to the internet.  I've installed SuSE and it's working as a
> standalone Unix, dual-booted with Windows ME.

> SBC normally has good tech support, but they are VERY clear they won't have
> anything to do with supporting Linux.

> I got SuSE mostly because they offer phone support as part of their
> package.  I even tested the phone support before buying SuSE, calling the
> number to see how long it took to get a human being on the line (response
> was immediate.  Impressive!)  I was especially concerned about the critical
> blackout period
> where I've installed Unix but have not yet brought up internet
> communications.  I was confident that Unix would work once installed, the
> main glitch I was worried about, the main worry, was connecting the thing to
> the internet without any support from my ISP.

> I read the entire manuals that came with SuSE before attempting
> installation.  OK, I skipped over some stuff, like how to do Word
> processing, but I read all the installation stuff.

> Well, I'm still blacked out.  I'm sending this via a reboot to Windoze.
> I've tested all my devices, Unix is up and working fine, better than I
> expected (my 100 Mb USB zip seems to be working while the SuSE website said
> it wouldn't).  I've tested it pretty thoroughly.

> Someone, an SBC user, told me privately that SuSE would give me a simple
> menu
> to configure my DSL with and that would be it.  The menu turned out to be
> indeed quite simple, exactly as he described it, so much so that I'm sure I
> filled it out accurately, but that wasn't it.  My DSL is not connected.
> When I do

> ping 1.1.1.1

> it responds with

> connect: network is unreachable

> Just for good measure, I tried

> ping 0.0.0.0

> which responds with a line after line of responses like

> PING 0.0.0.0 (127.0.0.1) from 127.0.0.1 : 56(84) bytes of data.  64 bytes
> from 127.0.0.1 icmp_seq=1 ttl=255 time=0.040 ms

> repeatedly, with times ranging from 0.034 ms to 0.040 ms.

> (I think that's it, I wrote it down on a piece of paper so I could type it
> in after rebooting to windoze).  Anyway, that looks to me like the machine
> just pings itself when you give it 0.0.0.0.  "man ping" was of no help, it
> says there is a "destination" field for "ping", but does not define its
> behavior, and I am not a "ping" expert.
> It would be good if I knew of a static IP address of a machine that I could
> count on being there to ping.  If I just copy an IP address from an email
> header, it might be dynamic and not there anymore, giving confusing results.

> As further evidence that I am not on the internet, I went into the web
> browser (in this case Konqueror) and tried to bring up http://cnn.com and it
> said

> An error occurred while loading http://cnn.com
> Unknown host cnn.com

> So either Cable News Network crashes every time I go onto Unix and comes
> back when I boot back to windoze, or my Unix isn't connecting to DSL.

> So I gather my DSL is not connected.

> When I called SuSE's much vaunted installation support for help with my DSL,
> I got a human being on the line right away (hooray) but the good news ended
> there.  They told me DSL support was "advanced support", that it would cost
> me about $40, and more importantly that no one currently present could
> provide it and I should call back tomorrow (no guarantee was made that
> anyone qualified would be on hand tomorrow, nor any prediction of when I
> could rely on such a source being available).  I said Oh.

> I experimented with Kmail, tried to configure it and was confused (the
> manual is pretty vague), I called SuSE again saying I had an e-mail problem
> and the story was similar, they say e-mail was an advanced topic, that it
> would cost.  I asked if the support doesn't include e-mail support what DOES
> it include?  The guy didn't answer that directly, he just said to e-mail in
> my request for support, because some topics are supported by e-mail but not
> by phone, but he wouldn't define which were which.  I sent in an e-mail,
> we'll see if I get anything back.

> Every ISP I've ever had was willing to hold my hand through setting up
> e-mail.  I know it's not rocket science, but that's one of the most basic
> things that customer support can possibly do.  What can the SuSE support
> people do, then?  Teach me Unix?  I don't need that!  I've spent 9 years of
> my life banging applications code on Unix machines with systems
> administrators taking care of me, it's the networking and administration
> where I need some help now.

> It looks like they've got me where they want me.  I don't really see a more
> attractive alternative to paying the $40 for DSL support and hoping that
> fixes it and the e-mail problem either goes away or can be remedied via
> e-mail from windoze.

> It reminds me of a story that I heard about when Chinese prospectors were
> traveling by ship to Australia to dig for gold over a century ago, they
> couldn't swim, and the (Australian or British) ship would drop anchor off
> Robe, South Australia, a few hundred yards off the shore, and inform the
> Chinese that being ferried those last few hundred yards in a rowboat was
> going to cost them twice the fare they had already paid for the thousands of
> miles they had come from China.  (OK, this isn't quite as bad as that, but
> the principle is the same).

 
 
 

1. Trouble with SuSE support, DSL, SBC

My PC has a Realteck RTL8139 NIC, connected to a Westell Wirespeed modem,
connected to a DSL phone jack, connected to SBC.

SBC normally has good tech support, but they won't have anything to do with
Linux.

I got SuSE, mostly because they offer phone support as part of their
package.  I was especially concerned about the critical blackout period
where I'm installing Unix but have not yet brought up internet
communications.

Well, I'm still blacked out.  I'm sending this via a reboot to Windoze.
Unix is up and working fine, I've tested it pretty thoroughly.

Someone, an sbc user, told me privately that sbc would give me a simple menu
to configure my DSL with and that would be it.  This turned out to be the
case, but that wasn't it.  My DSL is not connected.  When I do

ping 1.1.1.1

it responds with something like

ping: connect: not connected to network

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