Accessing Files on the DOS/Win95 Partitions

Accessing Files on the DOS/Win95 Partitions

Post by Skishore Sarath » Wed, 30 Jul 1997 04:00:00



Hi!
   I have a sytem running Redhat 4.2 of Linux.  While installing
linux, I configured the DOS/Win95 partitions to be visible &
mountable from linux.  I can see these partitions.  However, I
have two problems.  They are:

   1.  The files on the dos partitions are seen only with the 8.3
       filenames.  Longer names are truncated.

   2.  I can't seem to write into these partitions  if I'm not
       logged on as root.  Even as root, I cannot change the
       mode/ownership of files/directories on these dos partitions.
       I want to store some user files in the dos partitions and
       would like to avoid doing these things as root.

   I would appreciate any help in resolving these issues.  Thanks
in advance!!

kishore sarathy.


 
 
 

Accessing Files on the DOS/Win95 Partitions

Post by Frank Sweetse » Wed, 30 Jul 1997 04:00:00



> Hi!
>    I have a sytem running Redhat 4.2 of Linux.  While installing
> linux, I configured the DOS/Win95 partitions to be visible &
> mountable from linux.  I can see these partitions.  However, I
> have two problems.  They are:

>    1.  The files on the dos partitions are seen only with the 8.3
>        filenames.  Longer names are truncated.

>    2.  I can't seem to write into these partitions  if I'm not
>        logged on as root.  Even as root, I cannot change the
>        mode/ownership of files/directories on these dos partitions.
>        I want to store some user files in the dos partitions and
>        would like to avoid doing these things as root.

>    I would appreciate any help in resolving these issues.  Thanks
> in advance!!

Both these issues can be fixed by editing /etc/fstab  To get the long
filenames, change the occurnces of 'msdos' to 'vfat'.  As for the
read/write issues, it should be changin a different on - man fstab should
tell you the details for that.

--
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Accessing Files on the DOS/Win95 Partitions

Post by Azunna Anyanw » Wed, 30 Jul 1997 04:00:00



Quote:>Hi!
>   I have a sytem running Redhat 4.2 of Linux.  While installing
>linux, I configured the DOS/Win95 partitions to be visible &
>mountable from linux.  I can see these partitions.  However, I
>have two problems.  They are:
>   1.  The files on the dos partitions are seen only with the 8.3
>       filenames.  Longer names are truncated.

First, make sure your kenel has support for VFAT which is what Win95 uses
(either look through /usr/src/linux/.config or make config and make sure
it's checked).  Next, mount the partitions as vfat and not msdos.  To make
the change permannent, change /etc/fstab from msdos to vfat

Quote:>   2.  I can't seem to write into these partitions  if I'm not
>       logged on as root.  Even as root, I cannot change the
>       mode/ownership of files/directories on these dos partitions.
>       I want to store some user files in the dos partitions and
>       would like to avoid doing these things as root.

FAT has no concept of owner and group privileges but you can fudge it
slightly.  You'll want to become familiar with the mount command ("man
mount" or "man 8 mount").  What you might need is the umask, uid, gid, and
user options.  For me, I have umask=022.  YMMV

--

http://www.fas.harvard.edu/~anyanwu/
"That which doen't Kill you, only makes you Stronger!"

 
 
 

Accessing Files on the DOS/Win95 Partitions

Post by John Collin » Thu, 31 Jul 1997 04:00:00


I'm pretty new to this myself but using slakware 3.2 you just need to amend
the file /etc/fstab. (You need to be root to do this)

For each of your dos/windows partitions you should :
        change the fstype entry from msdos to vfat, this will give you the long
filenames

        change the last options (probably currently set to defaults) to user, rw
this will give other users read write access.

On the point of file ownership etc, I'm not sure that it's possible to do
that on a vfat partition.
BTW if your new to Linux a good book is a help, the HOW-TO's and man pages
are sometimes a bit difficult. I can heartily recommend Running Linux by
Matt Welsh & Lar Kaufman.

Hope some of this helps.

john collins



> Hi!
>    I have a sytem running Redhat 4.2 of Linux.  While installing
> linux, I configured the DOS/Win95 partitions to be visible &
> mountable from linux.  I can see these partitions.  However, I
> have two problems.  They are:

>    1.  The files on the dos partitions are seen only with the 8.3
>        filenames.  Longer names are truncated.

>    2.  I can't seem to write into these partitions  if I'm not
>        logged on as root.  Even as root, I cannot change the
>        mode/ownership of files/directories on these dos partitions.
>        I want to store some user files in the dos partitions and
>        would like to avoid doing these things as root.

>    I would appreciate any help in resolving these issues.  Thanks
> in advance!!

> kishore sarathy.



 
 
 

Accessing Files on the DOS/Win95 Partitions

Post by willi.. » Thu, 31 Jul 1997 04:00:00


Quote:>   1.  The files on the dos partitions are seen only with the 8.3
>       filenames.  Longer names are truncated.

You need to mount them vfat. You do this in /etc/fstab. See below
for an example.

Quote:>   2.  I can't seem to write into these partitions  if I'm not
>       logged on as root.  Even as root, I cannot change the
>       mode/ownership of files/directories on these dos partitions.
>       I want to store some user files in the dos partitions and
>       would like to avoid doing these things as root.

You have to set the permissions that you want the files on the partition
to be mounted as in /etc/fstab by using the umask option. I have all my
non linux partitions mounted 022 which allows other users read access to
them. Check the man pages if you dont know how to use umask. Here is a
line out of my /etc/fstab as an example. I run debian and so it may be
slightly different for Red Hat.

/dev/sdc1 /mnt/winNT vfat umask=022,noexec,noauto 0 0

--
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