Receiving mail to local IMAP server from POP3 accounts

Receiving mail to local IMAP server from POP3 accounts

Post by Keegan Al » Sun, 18 May 2003 00:17:44



I use several different operating systems and mail clients, so I'm
looking to setup an IMAP server on my Red Hat 9 box and receive all my
POP3 mail to it. Problem is I have no idea where to begin.  Is this
possible?  Can I somehow have an IMAP server that retrieves email from
other POP3 servers and have me read all the received mail via any IMAP
client?

Any links or suggestions would be appriciative.  Thanks,

Keeg.

 
 
 

Receiving mail to local IMAP server from POP3 accounts

Post by dav.. » Sun, 18 May 2003 00:44:02



Quote:> Can I somehow have an IMAP server that retrieves email from
> other POP3 servers and have me read all the received mail via any IMAP
> client?

No, you can have a MAIL SERVER that support Imap and then configure
fetchmail to do the "retrieving" part.
See the MAIL-ADMINISTRATOR-HOWTO and the documentation for Fetchmail.

Davide

 
 
 

Receiving mail to local IMAP server from POP3 accounts

Post by Bill Herma » Sun, 18 May 2003 01:53:15


Possibly you have a good reason for the IMAP server to retrieve the POP3
email, but I would suggest to have the POP3 email forwarded to the IMAP
server.  It would be much easier to forward all the mail from your POP3
accounts to your IMAP account than to mess with learning and installing more
software.  Forwarding is generally done via the mail provider's menu driven
interface.  It can also be done on UNIX systems by creating a ".forward"
file in your home directory on your POP3 account's system.  This can be done
with a text editor like vi.  The contents of this file is simply the email
address of the account you want to forward your mail to.

I really don't understand how POP3 persists when IMAP provides so much more
functionality.

I hope this helps.

Bill Herman


Quote:> I use several different operating systems and mail clients, so I'm
> looking to setup an IMAP server on my Red Hat 9 box and receive all my
> POP3 mail to it. Problem is I have no idea where to begin.  Is this
> possible?  Can I somehow have an IMAP server that retrieves email from
> other POP3 servers and have me read all the received mail via any IMAP
> client?

> Any links or suggestions would be appriciative.  Thanks,

> Keeg.

 
 
 

Receiving mail to local IMAP server from POP3 accounts

Post by Mark Crispi » Sun, 18 May 2003 06:29:40



> Can I somehow have an IMAP server that retrieves email from
> other POP3 servers and have me read all the received mail via any IMAP
> client?

UW imapd has that capability *if* the password on the POP3 server is the
same as your password on the IMAP server (the user name can be different).

To use this, instead of opening a name such as "INBOX" on the IMAP server,
give UW imapd a Pine-style mailbox name for the POP3 server, e.g.:
 {popserver.myisp.com/pop3/user=fred}

If you are using Pine as your IMAP client, then the name would be
something like:
 {imapserver.myhost.com/user=smith}{popserver.myisp.com/pop3/user=fred}

This is an example of using two different systems with two different user
names.  Note that the password MUST be the same on both.

If you want the messages moved to your IMAP server from the POP3 server,
then in recent versions (imap-2002c or imap-2003) of UW imapd you can use
a #move format name, such as:
 #move {popserver.myisp.com/pop3/user=fred} myispmail

This will move the POP3 messages from myisp.com to the "myispmail" mailbox
on your IMAP server.  As long as you have the IMAP session open,
approximately every minute the IMAP server will check the
popserver.myisp.com server to see if there are new messages in your POP3
mailbox; if so it will move those messages into your IMAP "myispmail"
mailbox.

If you don't want to use spaces, you can use a different delimiter
character, just as long as that character isn't in the POP3 specification,
e.g.:
 #move+{popserver.myisp.com/pop3/user=fred}+myispmail
to use "+" instead of space.

Note that this works only in UW imapd.  It will not work in other servers,
as it is not a standard part of the IMAP protocol.

-- Mark --

http://staff.washington.edu/mrc
Science does not emerge from voting, party politics, or public debate.

 
 
 

Receiving mail to local IMAP server from POP3 accounts

Post by James Knot » Sun, 18 May 2003 07:40:43



> I use several different operating systems and mail clients, so I'm
> looking to setup an IMAP server on my Red Hat 9 box and receive all my
> POP3 mail to it. Problem is I have no idea where to begin.  Is this
> possible?  Can I somehow have an IMAP server that retrieves email from
> other POP3 servers and have me read all the received mail via any IMAP
> client?

Use fetchmail to receive from the pop account.

--

Fundamentalism is fundamentally wrong.


james.knott.

 
 
 

Receiving mail to local IMAP server from POP3 accounts

Post by Jeroen Geilma » Sun, 18 May 2003 09:38:40


Bill Herman top-posted:

Quote:> I really don't understand how POP3 persists when IMAP provides so much more
> functionality.

Bandwidth.
IMAP requires much more bandwidth to support fully than POP3 does - this
is still a valid argument for 56K modem links.

The most important ones:

- live checking for new mail in ALL folders on the server
- making folders & manipulating messages ON THE SERVER

These things cost two-way traffic each and every time. It may not be
much but it is *traffic* - with POP you can be sure that it will never
generate more traffic than there is mail in the box.

Plus POP3 is easier to set up and maintain on the client side...

However, with the proliferation of broadband DSL and Cable it is indeed
time to boldly enter the new millennienniennium - as they say.

J

 
 
 

Receiving mail to local IMAP server from POP3 accounts

Post by Mark Crispi » Sun, 18 May 2003 11:47:29



> IMAP requires much more bandwidth to support fully than POP3 does - this
> is still a valid argument for 56K modem links.

This is not a valid argument with a properly-written IMAP client such as
Pine.  Pine is quite usable even on CDPD links.

Early IMAP work was done over a 2400 baud model line.  I doubt that anyone
would want to use a POP client over such a line.  A good IMAP client is
quite usable.

Quote:> The most important ones:
> - live checking for new mail in ALL folders on the server

THAT is due to inferior losing clients, such as Outlook [Express] and
Netscape, which in their hearts are POP3 clients babbled to talk IMAP.

Quote:> - making folders & manipulating messages ON THE SERVER

Why is this a "bandwidth" problem?

Quote:> These things cost two-way traffic each and every time. It may not be
> much but it is *traffic* - with POP you can be sure that it will never
> generate more traffic than there is mail in the box.

That presumes that messages are always downloaded to the client and then
deleted from the server.  What about POP3 clients that don't delete, and
always do a UIDL command as part of a synchronization step?

Quote:> Plus POP3 is easier to set up and maintain on the client side...

You must be talking about Outlook [Express] an Netscape again.

-- Mark --

http://staff.washington.edu/mrc
Science does not emerge from voting, party politics, or public debate.

 
 
 

Receiving mail to local IMAP server from POP3 accounts

Post by Jeroen Geilma » Sun, 18 May 2003 22:12:52




>>IMAP requires much more bandwidth to support fully than POP3 does - this
>>is still a valid argument for 56K modem links.

> This is not a valid argument with a properly-written IMAP client such as
> Pine.  Pine is quite usable even on CDPD links.

> Early IMAP work was done over a 2400 baud model line.

You're **ing me ? Didn't know IMAP was that old...

Quote:>  I doubt that anyone
> would want to use a POP client over such a line.  A good IMAP client is
> quite usable.

I'll certainly keep that in mind...

Quote:>>The most important ones:
>>- live checking for new mail in ALL folders on the server

> THAT is due to inferior losing clients, such as Outlook [Express] and
> Netscape, which in their hearts are POP3 clients babbled to talk IMAP.

Guilty.

Quote:>>- making folders & manipulating messages ON THE SERVER

> Why is this a "bandwidth" problem?

Hrm.. prolly guilty again - I was under the impression that IMAP tends
to keep connections open if it can, for "performance" reasons...

While the actual *data* exchanged is not much, the line would be kept busy.

But - guilty again, I use decent mail clients but have the most
"experience" using those funny M$ products...

Quote:>>These things cost two-way traffic each and every time. It may not be
>>much but it is *traffic* - with POP you can be sure that it will never
>>generate more traffic than there is mail in the box.

> That presumes that messages are always downloaded to the client and then
> deleted from the server.  What about POP3 clients that don't delete, and
> always do a UIDL command as part of a synchronization step?

Guilty!
I'm no expert - not even an amateur on mail protocols.

Quote:>>Plus POP3 is easier to set up and maintain on the client side...

> You must be talking about Outlook [Express] an Netscape again.

Yes, among others...

username
password
smtp server
pop server

That IS the minimal info needed - with IMAP you need at least one extra
bit - the structure of the mailbox.

Good thing I wasn't talking about sExchange, eh ?

As I said, I'm no expert of any kind - just used most of the clients
that exist over the years.

So... seeing that you run in academic circles - do YOU have any idea why
POP still persists with major ISPs ?

Since bandwidth (my God and yours) is not an issue, then what is it ?

My ISP uses it, by the way, but I use IMAP webmail from them
(squirrelmail, which rocks).

J

 
 
 

Receiving mail to local IMAP server from POP3 accounts

Post by Don Peasle » Sun, 18 May 2003 23:02:45





>>> IMAP requires much more bandwidth to support fully than POP3 does - this
>>> is still a valid argument for 56K modem links.

>> This is not a valid argument with a properly-written IMAP client such as
>> Pine.  Pine is quite usable even on CDPD links.

>> Early IMAP work was done over a 2400 baud model line.

> You're **ing me ? Didn't know IMAP was that old...

>>  I doubt that anyone
>> would want to use a POP client over such a line.  A good IMAP client is
>> quite usable.

> I'll certainly keep that in mind...

>>> The most important ones:
>>> - live checking for new mail in ALL folders on the server

>> THAT is due to inferior losing clients, such as Outlook [Express] and
>> Netscape, which in their hearts are POP3 clients babbled to talk IMAP.

> Guilty.

>>> - making folders & manipulating messages ON THE SERVER

>> Why is this a "bandwidth" problem?

> Hrm.. prolly guilty again - I was under the impression that IMAP tends
> to keep connections open if it can, for "performance" reasons...

> While the actual *data* exchanged is not much, the line would be kept busy.

> But - guilty again, I use decent mail clients but have the most
> "experience" using those funny M$ products...

>>> These things cost two-way traffic each and every time. It may not be
>>> much but it is *traffic* - with POP you can be sure that it will never
>>> generate more traffic than there is mail in the box.

>> That presumes that messages are always downloaded to the client and then
>> deleted from the server.  What about POP3 clients that don't delete, and
>> always do a UIDL command as part of a synchronization step?

> Guilty!
> I'm no expert - not even an amateur on mail protocols.

>>> Plus POP3 is easier to set up and maintain on the client side...

>> You must be talking about Outlook [Express] an Netscape again.

> Yes, among others...

> username
> password
> smtp server
> pop server

> That IS the minimal info needed - with IMAP you need at least one extra
> bit - the structure of the mailbox.

> Good thing I wasn't talking about sExchange, eh ?

> As I said, I'm no expert of any kind - just used most of the clients
> that exist over the years.

> So... seeing that you run in academic circles - do YOU have any idea why
> POP still persists with major ISPs ?

> Since bandwidth (my God and yours) is not an issue, then what is it ?

> My ISP uses it, by the way, but I use IMAP webmail from them
> (squirrelmail, which rocks).

> J

The main difference between POP3 and IMAP is where the messages are
stored after being read.  Few people configure thier POP3 clients to not
delete messages from the server.  Having previously read messages on the
IMAP server increases the bandwidth as the client must download the
message each time they view it.  Try going back to a message with a
large graphic embeded in it, or even worse, an M$ attachment of some kind.

   With IMAP (and forms of web mail) the ISP must run cleanup on the
client's mailboxes to delete messages older than the defined storage
limt.  The mail server also must have the storage to handle all the
stored mail.
--don--

 
 
 

Receiving mail to local IMAP server from POP3 accounts

Post by Lyndon Nerenber » Thu, 22 May 2003 07:01:10


    Don> The main difference between POP3 and IMAP is where the
    Don> messages are stored after being read.  Few people configure
    Don> thier POP3 clients to not delete messages from the server.
    Don> Having previously read messages on the IMAP server increases
    Don> the bandwidth as the client must download the message each
    Don> time they view it.  Try going back to a message with a large
    Don> graphic embeded in it, or even worse, an M$ attachment of
    Don> some kind.

Any reasonable IMAP client will keep a locally cached copy of the
viewed content. The IMAP protocol provides facilities specifically
designed to make this easy. IMAP also lets the client be selective
about what parts of the message to retrieve, so in the case of that
"M$" attachment, a good IMAP client wouldn't even download it in the
first place -- something that isn't even an option with POP.

    Don>    With IMAP (and forms of web mail) the ISP must run cleanup
    Don> on the client's mailboxes to delete messages older than the
    Don> defined storage limt.  The mail server also must have the
    Don> storage to handle all the stored mail.

This is a storage quota issue, and applies equally to POP. ISPs need
to learn to size their systems appropriately.

--lyndon

 
 
 

Receiving mail to local IMAP server from POP3 accounts

Post by James Knot » Thu, 22 May 2003 09:50:51



> I use several different operating systems and mail clients, so I'm
> looking to setup an IMAP server on my Red Hat 9 box and receive all my
> POP3 mail to it. Problem is I have no idea where to begin.  Is this
> possible?  Can I somehow have an IMAP server that retrieves email from
> other POP3 servers and have me read all the received mail via any IMAP
> client?

I have done just that.  I installed the imap server that came with RH 7.3
and used fetchmail to get the mail from the pop3 server.

--

Fundamentalism is fundamentally wrong.


james.knott.

 
 
 

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Any help much appreciated.

Richard Conway.

---

Web: http://www.rconway.co.uk

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