first fresh Linux install, need advice

first fresh Linux install, need advice

Post by cawel4ju » Mon, 28 Jan 2002 13:44:35



Hi!

RedHat 7.2 is downloading. (damn! this is long! it'll take 2 days in
total)

I want to setup a pure Linux box on:

MB: Asus P51430TX Titanium I B+
RAM: 128 MB
HD:  5 GB

How should I partition my HD? do those partitions make sense?
system partition: 3GB
swap partition:   256MB
user partion:     1,75GB

All in FAT32?

I have access to a w2k machine. Can I just put the 5GB HD on the w2k
machine, as a 2nd drive, install Linux on it from w2k, shutdown the
w2k machine, and then, take the 5GB HD and put it on my Asus
motherboard as a primary master HD and boot up the Linux box?  What
should I do to be sure it'll work? what program should I use to do
that kind of installation?

Thanks.

 
 
 

first fresh Linux install, need advice

Post by Joao Sena Ribeir » Mon, 28 Jan 2002 14:51:39



> How should I partition my HD? do those partitions make sense?
> system partition: 3GB
> swap partition:   256MB
> user partion:     1,75GB

If, by the user partition you mean the partition where /home will
reside, well it makes sense (depending on the number of users in
the machine). If you mean the /usr partition, take caution
because it can sometimes pass that 1,75 GiB. Mine uses 2,2 GiB.

Quote:> All in FAT32?

Well, Linux doesn't use FAT32. You'll mark your partitions with
Linux's fdisk as type 82 (swap) and 83 (Linux native).

The filesystems will be ext3 or ext2, depending on your choice
during the install.

Quote:> I have access to a w2k machine. Can I just put the 5GB HD on the w2k
> machine, as a 2nd drive, install Linux on it from w2k, shutdown the
> w2k machine, and then, take the 5GB HD and put it on my Asus
> motherboard as a primary master HD and boot up the Linux box?  What
> should I do to be sure it'll work? what program should I use to do
> that kind of installation?

I don't think that would be necessary. The first RedHat CDROM is
bootable. Just boot your computer with it and install the thing.

Regards, sena.

--

gpg fngrprint: DD04 A22B 8F8C 37F4 8930 5794 45FE 15D6 9A2A F85F
http://wwwkeys.pgp.net:11371/pks/lookup?op=get&search=0x9A2AF85F

 
 
 

first fresh Linux install, need advice

Post by Mark Taylo » Mon, 28 Jan 2002 21:36:38




Quote:> Hi!

> RedHat 7.2 is downloading. (damn! this is long! it'll take 2 days in
> total)

> I want to setup a pure Linux box on:

> MB: Asus P51430TX Titanium I B+
> RAM: 128 MB
> HD:  5 GB

> How should I partition my HD? do those partitions make sense?
> system partition: 3GB
> swap partition:   256MB
> user partion:     1,75GB

> All in FAT32?

> I have access to a w2k machine. Can I just put the 5GB HD on the w2k
> machine, as a 2nd drive, install Linux on it from w2k, shutdown the
> w2k machine, and then, take the 5GB HD and put it on my Asus
> motherboard as a primary master HD and boot up the Linux box?  What
> should I do to be sure it'll work? what program should I use to do
> that kind of installation?

> Thanks.

As a newby you should consider using the defaults supplied by Red Hat. This
is your first installation. Once you gain some knowledge and insight about
the various partitions then you can decide on the partition sizes for your
next install.

Keep it simple... let RH do the partition this time.

Cheers,
Mark
______________________________________________________________________________
Posted Via Binaries.net = SPEED+RETENTION+COMPLETION = http://www.binaries.net

 
 
 

first fresh Linux install, need advice

Post by cawel4ju » Tue, 29 Jan 2002 00:45:45


First, thanks Sena.

Quote:> > How should I partition my HD? do those partitions make sense?
> > system partition: 3GB
> > swap partition:   256MB
> > user partion:     1,75GB

> If, by the user partition you mean the partition where /home will
> reside, well it makes sense (depending on the number of users in
> the machine). If you mean the /usr partition, take caution
> because it can sometimes pass that 1,75 GiB. Mine uses 2,2 GiB.

well, by 'user', I meant everything that is not system-related (that
would be the '/home' directory?). As I usually do with Windows system.
The OS and programs on one partition, and another partition where you
store the documents. Typically, with a W2k system on a 5GB HD, I would
do 3GB for the system, and the balance for the rest (documents, mp3,
whatever).  I do this so that if my system crashes, I can reinstall
the system on the system partition without losing any data.

Now, with Linux, is it the same reasoning, except that you have to add
a swap partition? How do I decide during install, which directory goes
where? Please, recommend me with a '(partition size) -> (files
nature)'. BTW, I will be the only user.

Quote:> Well, Linux doesn't use FAT32. You'll mark your partitions with
> Linux's fdisk as type 82 (swap) and 83 (Linux native).

> The filesystems will be ext3 or ext2, depending on your choice
> during the install.

Okay. sorry, you see I am new to Linux. So then I shouldn't care what
is on the HD right now, and I guess during the install, Linux's fdisk
will be one of the first program to start, right?

Quote:> > I have access to a w2k machine. Can I just put the 5GB HD on the w2k
> > machine, as a 2nd drive, install Linux on it from w2k, shutdown the
> > w2k machine, and then, take the 5GB HD and put it on my Asus
> > motherboard as a primary master HD and boot up the Linux box?  What
> > should I do to be sure it'll work? what program should I use to do
> > that kind of installation?

> I don't think that would be necessary. The first RedHat CDROM is
> bootable. Just boot your computer with it and install the thing.

I don't have a CDROM on my Linux box. Then can I just do like I
thought? And tell the install program (which would be run on the w2k
box under w2k) to install a fresh copy of Linux on a particular HD? Or
then will Linux be configured for that specific motherboard?

Thank you very much for the help!

/Cawel

 
 
 

first fresh Linux install, need advice

Post by Bit Twist » Tue, 29 Jan 2002 01:46:35



Quote:

> Now, with Linux, is it the same reasoning, except that you have to add
> a swap partition? How do I decide during install, which directory goes
> where? Please, recommend me with a '(partition size) -> (files
> nature)'. BTW, I will be the only user.

You can create a 4 gig partition for linux and be able to have room for
a few versions for testing upgrades.  You then create partitions for
whatever you like based on what YOU think YOU need.
make a 40gig partiton called /mp3 if you like.

Something to read
http://www.mandrakeuser.org/docs/basics/index.html#fsh
http://www.pathname.com/fhs/

 
 
 

first fresh Linux install, need advice

Post by Wayne Thro » Tue, 29 Jan 2002 06:18:54



::: How should I partition my HD? do those partitions make sense?
::: system partition: 3GB
::: swap partition:   256MB
::: user partion:     1,75GB

:: If you mean the /usr partition, take caution because it can sometimes
:: pass that 1,75 GiB.  Mine uses 2,2 GiB.


: by 'user', I meant everything that is not system-related (that would
: be the '/home' directory?).  As I usually do with Windows system.  The
: OS and programs on one partition, and another partition where you
: store the documents.  Typically, with a W2k system on a 5GB HD, I
: would do 3GB for the system, and the balance for the rest (documents,
: mp3, whatever).  I do this so that if my system crashes, I can
: reinstall the system on the system partition without losing any data.
:
: Now, with Linux, is it the same reasoning, except that you have to add
: a swap partition?  How do I decide during install, which directory
: goes where?  Please, recommend me with a '(partition size) -> (files
: nature)'.  BTW, I will be the only user.

You don't absolutely, positively HAVE to add a swap partition.  I tend
to need one, because I tend to leave lots and lots of windows open to
resume work in, or to switch attention to, and I often oversubscribe the
memory.  Much more convenient to just swap the running program from disk
just as I left it, rather than to restart it and load files and such.

Other than that, I tend to put the system in one partition, and then put
the rest of the space under /home.  As you say, that means I can
reinstall or upgrade without needing to dump and reload anything
(though, of course, I do ensure my backups are up to date before any
such major surgery...)

So.  Currently, I've partitioned a 4gb chunk for "/" (the system root),
a large several-hundreds-of-megabytes swap partition, and the remaining
few gigabytes for /home.  I also remote-mount another machine's disk for
nightly automated backups, so I have a spare copy of most everything on
a different physical disk.

Now.  Some people use many, many more partitions.  For example, one for
/boot, one for "/", one for "/var", one for "/usr", and so on and so
forth.  For example, putting /boot into a separate partition can make it
easier to manage, if you frequently change the kernel you're running, or
you need to force that partition to be first on the disk for older
BIOSes to be able to deal with it.  You might want to separate /var from
/usr, because /var is changeable stuff, and /usr is normally read-only,
so you can exploit that for backup of system state in addition to your
user files.  And so on and so forth.  I don't fine-tune to that extent.

So.  The bottom line, your suggested layout seems fine.  I allocated an
extra-large system partition because I often add large-ish packages
(such as staroffice/openoffice), and because I had the extra space
to devote to such.

Note: you *could* get away with a smaller system partition,
if you omitted some things from the linux installation; eg, maybe
you don't need emacs or tex right away, or maybe you want to load
only kde and not gnome or vice versa.  There are some packagings
of linux that will load into well under a half-gig.

: I don't have a CDROM on my Linux box.  Then can I just do like I
: thought?  And tell the install program (which would be run on the w2k
: box under w2k) to install a fresh copy of Linux on a particular HD?
: Or then will Linux be configured for that specific motherboard?

What I do for systems without a CDROM is to load linux over the net.
I ensure that the installation files are visible via ftp on the
local net, then use the network isntallation instructions that
come with most linux packagings.   The linux installation
will need to run on the machine it is installing towards,
but you could first load the installation files into a windows
filesystem, and then reboot the installation from floppy disk.
And there are other possibilities, wich differ from packaging
to packaging (ie, redhat vs suse vs debian, etc), and so for
details of what's possible, you'll have to refer to information
specific to the packaging you wish to install.

Or to sum up, if you have in hand a cdrom, you will need SOME machine
with a cdrom, but it can be on some other machine on a local net (for
example).  And you will need to run the linux installer on the machine
which is eventually going to run linux, because, as you note, it needs
to figure out what the hardware configuration will be when it eventually
runs.

Hope this helps.


 
 
 

first fresh Linux install, need advice

Post by cawel4ju » Tue, 29 Jan 2002 13:15:22


Quote:> ::: How should I partition my HD? do those partitions make sense?
> ::: system partition: 3GB
> ::: swap partition:   256MB
> ::: user partion:     1,75GB

I've just read that RH recommends: 50MB for /boot.   After
re-thinking, I would do (HD size = 5GB):

/boot:    50MB
swap:    256MB (I have 128MB of RAM)
the rest:  3GB (the whole '/' hierarchy, except '/boot' and '/home')
/home:  1.75MB

I am sorry I was not clear before, but I am a newbie :)

Then it would be easy to upgrade and easy to reinstall the whole
thing, without losing the /home directory.  I will only use KDE and do
some software development mostly (Java, C/C++, Perl), as well as
experience the Linux world big time...

And for the CDROM installation, I will borrow a CDROM from another
machine, put it in my Linux box, and after installation, I'll take
back the CDROM.

Quote:> You might want to separate /var from
> /usr, because /var is changeable stuff, and /usr is normally read-only,
> so you can exploit that for backup of system state in addition to your
> user files.  

I didn't get that one. What would be the advantage of having '/var'
and '/usr' on different partitions?

Quote:> Hope this helps.

Yes, thanks a lot all! It helped big time!

/ Cawel

 
 
 

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