ntfs filesystems and kernel compiling. :(

ntfs filesystems and kernel compiling. :(

Post by Steph » Wed, 20 Mar 2002 22:09:09



I have read through most posts on here and have tried to figure out
how to setup my new linux install to be able to read my w2k/xp
partition.  But no such luck. :(  I'm totally new to this and haven't
got a clue in what to do.

I do know that I need ntfs filesystem loaded, but I don't know how to
do it...

Any quick guides???

thanks.

S.

 
 
 

ntfs filesystems and kernel compiling. :(

Post by Steve Marti » Wed, 20 Mar 2002 22:34:06



> I have read through most posts on here and have tried to figure out
> how to setup my new linux install to be able to read my w2k/xp
> partition.  But no such luck. :(  I'm totally new to this and haven't
> got a clue in what to do.

> I do know that I need ntfs filesystem loaded, but I don't know how to
> do it...

You don't state which distribution you're using, but here are some
general guidelines which hopefully will help.

To read your NTFS filesystem, the kernel indeed must include the
needed support. This can take two forms, either built-in (done
by recompiling the kernel) or as a module (also done by the
compile process, but frequently included pre-built as a module
with some distro installs). Try typing (as superuser)
"/sbin/insmod ntfs" and see if it works. If you have no error
message, type "/sbin/lsmod" and see if the list includes
"ntfs". If it does, you have successfully loaded the NTFS
module.

(If you get an error message after the "insmod" command, it
means that there is currently no module available on your
system for NTFS, which means you'll have to break down and
re-configure and re-compile the kernel.)

Once the module is loaded, it's just a matter of mounting
the partition on a mount point. Create a mount point
(which is simply an empty directory) somewhere in your
directory tree with "mkdir". Once the mount point exists,
type

  mount -t ntfs -o ro <whatever-the-partition-is> <mount-point>

and it should mount the partition for reading.

Note the "for reading" above --- read-only support for NTFS
works safely. Read/write support is experimental and is
currently regarded as dangerous. You Have Been Warned.

 
 
 

ntfs filesystems and kernel compiling. :(

Post by d1223 » Thu, 21 Mar 2002 00:35:24


you need to have your kernel sources

that depends on your distr but they should be in a packages somehwre

then work out how to recompile your kernel, theres various howto's on
this - check linuxdoc.org

add ntfs support when configing the new kernel

then u just need to mount the partition

"man mount" for more info

NTFS support is however experimental - i do not think you can write, only
read

good luck!


> I have read through most posts on here and have tried to figure out how
> to setup my new linux install to be able to read my w2k/xp partition.
> But no such luck. :(  I'm totally new to this and haven't got a clue in
> what to do.

> I do know that I need ntfs filesystem loaded, but I don't know how to do
> it...

> Any quick guides???

> thanks.

> S.

 
 
 

ntfs filesystems and kernel compiling. :(

Post by Marc Jorda » Wed, 20 Mar 2002 23:43:33



> (Mar 19 Mar 2002 16:35) :
> NTFS support is however experimental - i do not think you can write,
> only read

   It is possible to write too, but the kernel itself advices you to be
careful since write support is not full implemented and you could
corrupt your data. I personally have used write feature on a test
partition and have had no problem, but it is not something I would
recommend on any important data partition (particulary if no backup is
available).

--

   Marc Jordan.

 
 
 

1. Talk refused to talk:(:(:(:(

Hello there people:)...
  I had linux kernel 1.2.8 installed in my system. I have a SLIP/PPP
connection using either dip (for SLIP) or pppd/chat (for PPP).
  Now, Most of my network stuff are working fine without any problem at all
except talk. Talk works fine for local chatting. No problem at all. The
problem is when ever I call out to other machine (using the SLIP/PPP line),
nothing has ever happen. It got as far as Checking invitation stuff. Never
more.
  Just out of curiosity I ran netstate to check the udp connection whenever
I have talk running. Running locally (talk that is) I got output as follow:

Active Internet connections
Proto Recv-Q Send-Q Local Address          Foreign Address        (State)
User
udp        0      0 lucifer.newpaltz.:1328 *:*                    

Which I presumed opened by talk (only one here because the other side hadn't
responded to the call yet).  I also get the same thing whenever I call
someone outside my system to talk. Of course, it never got to the other
system (I was waiting on the other system using telnet for the talk request,
never got there. And I had made sure that mesg was y).

Now when I call *IN* from other system (telnet to another system and run
talk over there to my system), I have (on my system) output as follow:

Active Internet connections
Proto Recv-Q Send-Q Local Address          Foreign Address        (State)
User

And also from netstat -a, I could find talk/ntalk were still listening.
Seems to me the call from outside didn't get through.

Now, since I haven't done anything to configure talk specifically, is there
anything I have to do to make this connection possible. Since I can't talk
to outside nor can I receive talk request from other hosts, I'm under the
assumption that my talk program somehow is not configured properly.

Any configuration file I have to check?
man, faq, howto, etc to refer to this kind of error?
May be replace my talk/ntalk/talkd/ntalkd with something else and where to
find it/them?
Does it depend on something in the kernel that I have to enable during the
compile time?
Wrong version altogether with the kernel?
Is it possible that talk needs long time to make the connection? (None of my
other stuff that I know of behave like this).
May be my inetd is broken?
If so, how do I check for it?
And where to find the latest version of it?

And while I'm at it, what's the latest version of talk?
Where to find it?
Is there a better chatting program that's backward compatible with talk?
Meaning that the program has more features than talk but at the same time
can be used to communicate with other regular talk program whenever the
program is not available on the other host.

--
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