fstab question

fstab question

Post by c.. » Sun, 06 Sep 1998 04:00:00



I've been messing with Slackware, it's good, but decided to try Debian
because of their packaging system.

One thing I liked with the Slackware setup (that Debian doesn't do)
was for a dual-boot box it gives you prompts to setup your lilo.conf
such that with a dual boot, LILO would stop so that I could type "lin"
or "dos" (or whatever I choose to call them) to go to either OS at
bootup time.

After installing Debian I copied the old  lilo.conf  file from my
Slack system to /etc (over the one Debian had made) and executed
/sbin/lilo and rebooted. It worked fine.

However, I also copied the old (Slack) fstab file to Debian.  With
this  I had (Slack) Linux automatically mount the Dos partition  to
the tree as /dos.  It didn't work in Debian.   What's up?   Here it
is:

/dev/hda3       swap        swap        defaults   0   0
/dev/hda2       /        ext2        defaults   1   1
/dev/hda1      /dos       vfat     defaults  1    0
none             /proc    proc        defaults   0   0

For comparison, here's the one that Debian produced:

# /etc/fstab: static file system information.
#
# <file system>   <mount point>     <type>    <options> <dump>    <pass>
/dev/hda2       /       ext2    defaults,errors=remount-ro   0      1
/dev/hda3               none            swap    sw          0       0
proc                /proc           proc    defaults    0       0

What do I need to tweak?

 
 
 

fstab question

Post by Hoe-Teck We » Sun, 06 Sep 1998 04:00:00



> I've been messing with Slackware, it's good, but decided to try Debian
> For comparison, here's the one that Debian produced:

> /dev/hda2       /       ext2    defaults,errors=remount-ro   0      1
> /dev/hda3               none            swap    sw          0       0
> proc                /proc           proc    defaults    0       0

Just add

    /dev/hda1      /dos       vfat     defaults  1    0

to /etc/fstab in Debian, and make sure that the mount point /dos exists
and that you've got the vfat module compiled into your Debian kernel.

Hope that helps.

- hoeteck

 
 
 

fstab question

Post by c.. » Sun, 06 Sep 1998 04:00:00


Quote:>> I've been messing with Slackware, it's good, but decided to try Debian
>> For comparison, here's the one that Debian produced:

>> /dev/hda2       /       ext2    defaults,errors=remount-ro   0      1
>> /dev/hda3               none            swap    sw          0       0
>> proc                /proc           proc    defaults    0       0

>Just add

>    /dev/hda1      /dos       vfat     defaults  1    0

>to /etc/fstab in Debian, and make sure that the mount point /dos exists
>and that you've got the vfat module compiled into your Debian kernel.

Thanks, I appreciate it, but it doesn't seem to be working.    I do
have the /dos directory on the tree and I can mount hda1 on it with:

mount -t vfat /dev/hda1 /dos

so vfat does come with the default kernel.

I tried:

/dev/hda1      /dos       vfat     defaults  1    0
/dev/hda2       /       ext2    defaults,errors=remount-ro   0     1
/dev/hda3               none            swap    sw          0       0
proc                /proc           proc    defaults    0       0

as well as:

/dev/hda2       /       ext2    defaults,errors=remount-ro   0     1
/dev/hda3               none            swap    sw          0       0
/dev/hda1      /dos       vfat     defaults  1    0
proc                /proc           proc    defaults    0       0

Any suggestions anyone?  Does the order in which the partitions are
listed in fstab metter?  Does the tab spacing affect things?

Also notice that the old Slack fstab had for the swap:
 /dev/hda3       swap        swap        defaults   0   0

whereas Debian has
/dev/hda3               none            swap    sw          0       0

Does that "none" make a difference?  Thanks.

 
 
 

fstab question

Post by Rene van Oostru » Mon, 07 Sep 1998 04:00:00



> Thanks, I appreciate it, but it doesn't seem to be working.    I do
> have the /dos directory on the tree and I can mount hda1 on it with:

> mount -t vfat /dev/hda1 /dos

> so vfat does come with the default kernel.

> I tried:

> /dev/hda1      /dos       vfat     defaults  1    0
> /dev/hda2       /       ext2    defaults,errors=remount-ro   0     1
> /dev/hda3               none            swap    sw          0       0
> proc                /proc           proc    defaults    0       0

> as well as:

> /dev/hda2       /       ext2    defaults,errors=remount-ro   0     1
> /dev/hda3               none            swap    sw          0       0
> /dev/hda1      /dos       vfat     defaults  1    0
> proc                /proc           proc    defaults    0       0

> Any suggestions anyone?  Does the order in which the partitions are
> listed in fstab metter?  Does the tab spacing affect things?

Check out /etc/rc.d/rc.sysinit: that's where the actual mounting is
done (at least, on my system (RedHat)). See if the -a option (i.e.,
auto-mount the devices listed in /etc/fstab) is given
to mount.

Quote:> Also notice that the old Slack fstab had for the swap:
>  /dev/hda3       swap        swap        defaults   0   0

> whereas Debian has
> /dev/hda3               none            swap    sw          0       0

> Does that "none" make a difference?  Thanks.

From 'man mount':

       The proc file system is  not  associated  with  a  special
       device,  and  when mounting it, an arbitrary keyword, such
       as proc can be used instead  of  a  device  specification.
       (The  customary  choice  none is less fortunate: the error
       message `none busy' from umount can be confusing.)

So I think the same holds for your swap device.

Bye,
Rene

 
 
 

fstab question

Post by c.. » Mon, 07 Sep 1998 04:00:00


Quote:

>Check out /etc/rc.d/rc.sysinit: that's where the actual mounting is
>done (at least, on my system (RedHat)). See if the -a option (i.e.,
>auto-mount the devices listed in /etc/fstab) is given
>to mount.

Thanks, but neither Debian nor Slackware have   /etc/rc.d/rc.sysinit
(I still have Slackware on my laptop)

Debian does have a file   /etc/rcS.d/S35mountall.sh   which includes
the lines:

#Mount local filesystems in /etc/fstab
[ "$VERBOSE != no ] && echo "Mounting local file systems..."
mount -avt nonfs,noproc

Is this the file?  It seems to have an -a switch.   What to do?

 
 
 

fstab question

Post by Rene van Oostru » Mon, 07 Sep 1998 04:00:00



> >Check out /etc/rc.d/rc.sysinit: that's where the actual mounting is
> >done (at least, on my system (RedHat)). See if the -a option (i.e.,
> >auto-mount the devices listed in /etc/fstab) is given
> >to mount.

> Thanks, but neither Debian nor Slackware have   /etc/rc.d/rc.sysinit
> (I still have Slackware on my laptop)

> Debian does have a file   /etc/rcS.d/S35mountall.sh   which includes
> the lines:

> #Mount local filesystems in /etc/fstab
> [ "$VERBOSE != no ] && echo "Mounting local file systems..."
> mount -avt nonfs,noproc

> Is this the file?  It seems to have an -a switch.   What to do?

Hmmm... this is silly. You might try changing (in fstab)

  /dev/hda1    /dos  vfat     defaults     1 0
to
  /dev/hda1    /dos  vfat     defaults,auto     1 0

(although, according to 'man mount', defaults includes auto)

Otherwise, just add

  mount -t vfat /dev/hda1 /dos

to /etc/rcS.d/S35mountall.sh

Both options seem somewhat unsatisfactory to me, but hey, they might
work... :-)

Good luck,
Rene

 
 
 

fstab question

Post by Rene van Oostru » Mon, 07 Sep 1998 04:00:00



> Otherwise, just add

>   mount -t vfat /dev/hda1 /dos

> to /etc/rcS.d/S35mountall.sh

Oops! If you do it this way, you should also take care that the device
will be unmounted on shutdown/reboot. Look for the file where the
other devices are unmounted, and add a line there

Rene

 
 
 

fstab question

Post by Thand » Mon, 07 Sep 1998 04:00:00


Quote:>Hmmm... this is silly. You might try changing (in fstab)

>  /dev/hda1    /dos  vfat     defaults     1 0
>to
>  /dev/hda1    /dos  vfat     defaults,auto     1 0

>(although, according to 'man mount', defaults includes auto)

>Otherwise, just add

>  mount -t vfat /dev/hda1 /dos

>to /etc/rcS.d/S35mountall.sh

>Both options seem somewhat unsatisfactory to me, but hey, they might
>work... :-)

Hmm, that really shouldn't be necessary. If you can mount vfat after the
system has booted, but not during boot time, it suggests that you have vfat
configured as a module and are trying to mount the drive before the vfat
module is loaded. Under debian, simply add a line with "auto" on it in the
file /etc/modules. That may very well fix the problem.

--
- Thandor, of Donuts Inc:
Through emulation of Homer Simpson we shall attain perfection.

Linux: Everybody's talking about the GNU kid in town. :)

 
 
 

fstab question

Post by c.. » Tue, 08 Sep 1998 04:00:00


Quote:>Hmm, that really shouldn't be necessary. If you can mount vfat after the
>system has booted, but not during boot time, it suggests that you have vfat
>configured as a module and are trying to mount the drive before the vfat
>module is loaded. Under debian, simply add a line with "auto" on it in the
>file /etc/modules. That may very well fix the problem.

Thanks...that was it!   The file /etc/modules has the line:

#auto

which you just have to remove the # and reboot and it worked.
(Slackware doesn't have /etc/modules)

A clue could be found during the bootup sequence when it says
"mounting local file system" followed by "fs vfat not supported by
kernel" which implied that it was a module.

But here was another thing I discovered, and while I'm in the
misc/setup ng, I'd like to know:  How come in the Debian version of vi
the Delete key changes the captalization of a character whereas the
Slackware version of vi just plain deletes?    I copied over my
.xinitrc file which I was using in Slackware, but that didn't work.

 Also, to write-quit in Slack vi you use :wq!  but in Debian it's just
:wq   (that took some getting used to)

I had to use Debian's ae editor because I couldn't delete that #
comment with vi.   ...and what's with ae's key commands?   You only
need to do ctrl-q to quit but you have to use ctrl-xs to save and ctrl
xc to exit.  Why not just ctrl s to save and ctrl c to exit? Why the
extra "x" key?

I have nothing but praise for the volunteers who have put all the
GNU/Linux stuff together, but as I have found (read this thread)
perhaps a bit more standards agreement among the distributions might
be needed.    Otherwise, Thanks again!

 
 
 

1. fstab question

What is the problem with this line?

LABEL=/ops              /mnt/opserve            smbfs   user,noauto

I want to mount a drive from a WinNT box (NTFS) to a RH7.2 and I want
to enable any user to do the mounting.

2. xvttool under Solaris 2.x ??

3. /etc/fstab question

4. How is a bootable backup floppy make??

5. fstab questions

6. two questions regarding netscape navigator

7. xwindows says I need to select a keyboard

8. Quick FSTAB question

9. quick FSTAB question

10. mount/fstab question (noauto option?)

11. fstab question...

12. fstab question