Best Linux

Best Linux

Post by Jeff Wo » Tue, 25 Feb 1997 04:00:00



Ok, I'd really like to give Linux a try. As a clueless newbie to linux,
and not having purchased a CD, I'd like to ask the following questions:

1) What CD distribution in (IYHO) the best to use for an AMD 5x86 system?
2)  (as above)...                                 for an Amiga 2000/68020
3) If a CD is not what I need, what should I do?
4) If there is a FAQ that addresses all these ?'s, where is it?

    Thanks in advance,

       Jeff

---------------------------------------------------------------------  

A.K.A. Mr. Byte, Sysop, West Point Power & Light <<in Exile>>

 - My PC runs OS/2...because Bill is NOT Ghod!
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Best Linux

Post by Perry Gri » Thu, 27 Feb 1997 04:00:00



Quote:(Jeff Wood) writes:

|> Ok, I'd really like to give Linux a try. As a clueless newbie to linux,
|> and not having purchased a CD, I'd like to ask the following questions:
|>
|> 1) What CD distribution in (IYHO) the best to use for an AMD 5x86 system?
|> 2)  (as above)...                                 for an Amiga 2000/68020
|> 3) If a CD is not what I need, what should I do?
|> 4) If there is a FAQ that addresses all these ?'s, where is it?
|>
|>     Thanks in advance,
|>     Jeff

The CD is the best way to go for someone new.  Otherwise you may
end up frustrated and missing some chuncks of software.  RedHat
is a good choice for newbies (and lots of people).  I've run
yggdrasil, slackware, and now redhat (in that order).  Debian
sounds interesting but I'll tell you to try is your second time
around.

In the states, http://www.infomagic.com/ (Infomagic) is a good
place to get a good CD collection (6 CD set).  For under $30
you can get the 3 major distributions plus some archives with
other stuff.  One of the CDs is a RedHat for intel compatible
CPUs (which you have).

Documentation...  
http://www.linux.org
http://sunsite.unc.edu has alot on info.
There are a bunch of howto's.  Pick some general ones and start
reading.  

Congradulations on wanting to try linux.  Thought I'd add
there is also another unix clone (non-linux) you may want
to look at some day.  It's called FreeBSD (http://www.freebsd.org/).
You will find either system heavy duty.  Linux is new(er)
and more popular and has been growing faster.  FreeBSD has
more heritage and is very solid, but perhaps supports less
hardware variety.

Perry