old bios doesn't c 6.4 gb hard drive

old bios doesn't c 6.4 gb hard drive

Post by Mavric » Thu, 05 Jul 2001 02:03:46



Hello, I wanted to install redhat 6.2 or what ever version and the install
only sees 2G out of 6.4 available.  Does any1 know how to fix that?  I know
1 way is to have multiple 2G partiotions but I want to keep it all under 1
6.4G hard drive.

Thanks.

-mavrick-

 
 
 

old bios doesn't c 6.4 gb hard drive

Post by Bill Pit » Thu, 05 Jul 2001 03:12:30



> Hello, I wanted to install redhat 6.2 or what ever version and the install
> only sees 2G out of 6.4 available.  Does any1 know how to fix that?  I know
> 1 way is to have multiple 2G partiotions but I want to keep it all under 1
> 6.4G hard drive.

d00d, j00 n33dz t0 updat3 j00 b105.  (Sorry, couldn't resist :) )

You have a computer with an old BIOS.  You can either buy a new
motherboard/controller with a newer bios that supports disks > 2gb,
or you can download a utility from your drive manufacturer that
loads at boot time and forces the machine to recognize the larger
disk.  (The last time I did this was a long time ago when installing
a 540mb drive in a 486 that would only recognize a 512mb disk)

-Bill
--
Bill Pitz
e-mail: bill at bill pitz dotcom

 
 
 

old bios doesn't c 6.4 gb hard drive

Post by Glen Sanf » Thu, 05 Jul 2001 07:13:50




> > Hello, I wanted to install redhat 6.2 or what ever version and the install
> > only sees 2G out of 6.4 available.  Does any1 know how to fix that?  I know
> > 1 way is to have multiple 2G partiotions but I want to keep it all under 1
> > 6.4G hard drive.

> d00d, j00 n33dz t0 updat3 j00 b105.  (Sorry, couldn't resist :) )

> You have a computer with an old BIOS.  You can either buy a new
> motherboard/controller with a newer bios that supports disks > 2gb,
> or you can download a utility from your drive manufacturer that
> loads at boot time and forces the machine to recognize the larger
> disk.  (The last time I did this was a long time ago when installing
> a 540mb drive in a 486 that would only recognize a 512mb disk)

> -Bill
> --
> Bill Pitz
> e-mail: bill at bill pitz dotcom

Your limitation is only in the initial setup.  Once you have Linux
running, it won't need to discuss any of that stuff with your BIOS.  I've
got an 8 GB hard drive on an old 486 that can't see any more than a small
fraction of it.  The BIOS is from 1992 or thereabouts.  As long as the
BIOS isn't so braindead it can't read the boot sector, you'll be
successful.

If you have a valid partition table it ought to work; especially if there
are Linux native and Linux swap partitions for the installer to offer for
your selection.  Start the installer and try another VT.  From there run
fdisk and put what you want as the partition table.  You may have to
restart the installation - I don't know.  All that RedHat stuff is fancier
than me.

DON'T use any utilities to set up the disk first.  If you have, then undo
it via the software or by zeroing a bunch of the beginning of the drive
and put a proper partition table on it.

If the RedHat installation doesn't provide enough of an environment to do
that sort of stuff you can find system_on_a_floppy's all over the place
(search for cramdisk, or tomsrtbt).

I'd put about 100MB of swap as the first partition and a couple or three
hundred more for /var, a couple GB for /, and the rest for /home.

That is:

  Linux swap    100 MB
  Linux native  300 MB  (for /var)
  Linux native    2 GB  (for /)
  Linux native    4 GB  (for /home)

In that order.  They can all be primary partitions.  That will put all the
stuff which can best use the fastest disk speed out at the perimeter.

Glen

 
 
 

old bios doesn't c 6.4 gb hard drive

Post by Dave Uhrin » Thu, 05 Jul 2001 10:27:50





>> > Hello, I wanted to install redhat 6.2 or what ever version and the
>> > install
>> > only sees 2G out of 6.4 available.  Does any1 know how to fix that?
>> >  I know 1 way is to have multiple 2G partiotions but I want to keep
>> > it all under 1 6.4G hard drive.

>> d00d, j00 n33dz t0 updat3 j00 b105.  (Sorry, couldn't resist :) )

>> You have a computer with an old BIOS.  You can either buy a new
>> motherboard/controller with a newer bios that supports disks > 2gb,
>> or you can download a utility from your drive manufacturer that
>> loads at boot time and forces the machine to recognize the larger
>> disk.  (The last time I did this was a long time ago when installing
>> a 540mb drive in a 486 that would only recognize a 512mb disk)

>> -Bill
>> --
>> Bill Pitz
>> e-mail: bill at bill pitz dotcom

> Your limitation is only in the initial setup.  Once you have Linux
> running, it won't need to discuss any of that stuff with your BIOS.
> I've got an 8 GB hard drive on an old 486 that can't see any more than
> a small
> fraction of it.  The BIOS is from 1992 or thereabouts.  As long as the
> BIOS isn't so braindead it can't read the boot sector, you'll be
> successful.

> If you have a valid partition table it ought to work; especially if
> there are Linux native and Linux swap partitions for the installer to
> offer for
> your selection.  Start the installer and try another VT.  From there
> run
> fdisk and put what you want as the partition table.  You may have to
> restart the installation - I don't know.  All that RedHat stuff is
> fancier than me.

> DON'T use any utilities to set up the disk first.  If you have, then
> undo it via the software or by zeroing a bunch of the beginning of the
> drive and put a proper partition table on it.

> If the RedHat installation doesn't provide enough of an environment to
> do that sort of stuff you can find system_on_a_floppy's all over the
> place (search for cramdisk, or tomsrtbt).

> I'd put about 100MB of swap as the first partition and a couple or
> three hundred more for /var, a couple GB for /, and the rest for
> /home.

> That is:

>   Linux swap  100 MB
>   Linux native        300 MB  (for /var)
>   Linux native          2 GB  (for /)
>   Linux native          4 GB  (for /home)

> In that order.  They can all be primary partitions.  That will put all
> the stuff which can best use the fastest disk speed out at the
> perimeter.

> Glen

You haven't figured out yet that Linux filesystems don't care whether
they are at the perimeter of the drive or not :-)

Linux is NOT MS-DOS!

 
 
 

old bios doesn't c 6.4 gb hard drive

Post by Glen Sanf » Thu, 05 Jul 2001 17:22:48






> >> > Hello, I wanted to install redhat 6.2 or what ever version and the
> >> > install
> >> > only sees 2G out of 6.4 available.  Does any1 know how to fix that?
> >> >  I know 1 way is to have multiple 2G partiotions but I want to keep
> >> > it all under 1 6.4G hard drive.

> >> d00d, j00 n33dz t0 updat3 j00 b105.  (Sorry, couldn't resist :) )

> >> You have a computer with an old BIOS.  You can either buy a new
> >> motherboard/controller with a newer bios that supports disks > 2gb,
> >> or you can download a utility from your drive manufacturer that
> >> loads at boot time and forces the machine to recognize the larger
> >> disk.  (The last time I did this was a long time ago when installing
> >> a 540mb drive in a 486 that would only recognize a 512mb disk)

> >> -Bill
> >> --
> >> Bill Pitz
> >> e-mail: bill at bill pitz dotcom

> > Your limitation is only in the initial setup.  Once you have Linux
> > running, it won't need to discuss any of that stuff with your BIOS.
> > I've got an 8 GB hard drive on an old 486 that can't see any more than
> > a small
> > fraction of it.  The BIOS is from 1992 or thereabouts.  As long as the
> > BIOS isn't so braindead it can't read the boot sector, you'll be
> > successful.

> > If you have a valid partition table it ought to work; especially if
> > there are Linux native and Linux swap partitions for the installer to
> > offer for
> > your selection.  Start the installer and try another VT.  From there
> > run
> > fdisk and put what you want as the partition table.  You may have to
> > restart the installation - I don't know.  All that RedHat stuff is
> > fancier than me.

> > DON'T use any utilities to set up the disk first.  If you have, then
> > undo it via the software or by zeroing a bunch of the beginning of the
> > drive and put a proper partition table on it.

> > If the RedHat installation doesn't provide enough of an environment to
> > do that sort of stuff you can find system_on_a_floppy's all over the
> > place (search for cramdisk, or tomsrtbt).

> > I'd put about 100MB of swap as the first partition and a couple or
> > three hundred more for /var, a couple GB for /, and the rest for
> > /home.

> > That is:

> >   Linux swap  100 MB
> >   Linux native        300 MB  (for /var)
> >   Linux native          2 GB  (for /)
> >   Linux native          4 GB  (for /home)

> > In that order.  They can all be primary partitions.  That will put all
> > the stuff which can best use the fastest disk speed out at the
> > perimeter.

> > Glen

> You haven't figured out yet that Linux filesystems don't care whether
> they are at the perimeter of the drive or not :-)

> Linux is NOT MS-DOS!

I've known that intimately for several years, thank you.  

Have you ever heard of physics?  That's the basis for my suggestion.
hdparm -t on two partitions at the inner and outer limits of the disk
doesn't show the proper difference.  If you copy a large file from another
disk (on another interface) to/from inner and outer partitions in a
comparative way, you'll see what I'm talking about.  It's possible some
disk manufacturers may deposit a greater density of medium at the inner
portions of the platter in an effort to lessen the difference.  But I'd
think it's a safe bet to consider the outer portions to have a larger
number of bits pass the head per revolution than the inner ones.

It's bad enough when swap space needs utilization - and putting it
physically far away from the "normally" active part of the disk isn't
great either (the access time) - but when it does come into play, it's
nice to have the reading/writing (once it's started) performed with the
greatest possible alacrity.

Glen

 
 
 

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