Switch from MvBase to MS Access?

Switch from MvBase to MS Access?

Post by Ed Sheeha » Sun, 27 Jul 2003 01:26:24



Gang,

I have a client who process about 300 order per week. Currently running
MvBase/NT with probably 100 licensed seats. They say they're spending
approximately $50K/year on costs.

They are considering dumping the whole ball of wax and putting everything on
MS Access. I'm getting more specific cost info now, but I know that they
have OE, inventory, reporting, and all the other functionality that goes
with distribution. They just can't handle the TCO with their current cash
flow.

But I can't see them on MS access either. Is there a cheaper Pick solution
out there wich would allow them to migrate from Pick to Pick? I believe that
going to MS Access would be product-cheap and labor-expensive.

Thanks for any ideas,

Ed

 
 
 

Switch from MvBase to MS Access?

Post by hRodstei » Sun, 27 Jul 2003 02:35:16


What percentage of there gross sales per year is that 50K?  What is their
overall layout for IT as compared to their gross sales?


Quote:> Gang,

> I have a client who process about 300 order per week. Currently running
> MvBase/NT with probably 100 licensed seats. They say they're spending
> approximately $50K/year on costs.

> They are considering dumping the whole ball of wax and putting everything
on
> MS Access. I'm getting more specific cost info now, but I know that they
> have OE, inventory, reporting, and all the other functionality that goes
> with distribution. They just can't handle the TCO with their current cash
> flow.

> But I can't see them on MS access either. Is there a cheaper Pick solution
> out there wich would allow them to migrate from Pick to Pick? I believe
that
> going to MS Access would be product-cheap and labor-expensive.

> Thanks for any ideas,

> Ed


 
 
 

Switch from MvBase to MS Access?

Post by BobJ » Sun, 27 Jul 2003 03:27:45


Did someone fail to mention to them that MS suggests that Access is not good
for more than five users???  Actually, those most be pretty big orders if
there are only 300 in a week and they have been supporting the kind of
overhead that is implied with your numbers.
I have seen very complete order entry and accounting systems on MS Access
but they were not cheap to implement, taking many man months of effort.
Also, 50k per year won't even pay for the administrator that they are going
to have to have if they go to a "main line" implementation.
Perhaps you need to dig a little deeper.
BobJ

Quote:> Gang,

> I have a client who process about 300 order per week. Currently running
> MvBase/NT with probably 100 licensed seats. They say they're spending
> approximately $50K/year on costs.

> They are considering dumping the whole ball of wax and putting everything
on
> MS Access. I'm getting more specific cost info now, but I know that they
> have OE, inventory, reporting, and all the other functionality that goes
> with distribution. They just can't handle the TCO with their current cash
> flow.

> But I can't see them on MS access either. Is there a cheaper Pick solution
> out there wich would allow them to migrate from Pick to Pick? I believe
that
> going to MS Access would be product-cheap and labor-expensive.

> Thanks for any ideas,

> Ed

 
 
 

Switch from MvBase to MS Access?

Post by Ed Sheeha » Sun, 27 Jul 2003 04:10:54


Further info:

Total Employees : 12
Desired Employees: 6

The $50K costs are from the employees. The owner spends ~ 3 min per order
taken, ~2 min more to ship. At 300 orders/week, that's ~ 1500 minutes or 25
hours/week spent on most of the business. He can't justify the number of
employees he has, so after an analysis of who really does what, he intends
to make the switch.

I am attempting to persuade him to reduce the complexity of the Pick
software, so that if/when the business expands, he can re-scale back to
where he was with way less growing pains than moving back from MS Access.
That would seem to let him have the best of both worlds: Easier software
tasking, with built-in bounce-back when the time is right.

I think the initial costs would be to provide a software/menu subset of what
they're currently using, retaining file structures, and allowing an improved
workflow/menu navigation for better ease-of-use for new/green employees.
Sort of simplifying the business rules.

We usually think of adding more capability/complexity when dealing with
companies, but these days, a retraction may be what's needed, at least for
the short term.

Ed


> What percentage of there gross sales per year is that 50K?  What is
> their overall layout for IT as compared to their gross sales?



>> Gang,

>> I have a client who process about 300 order per week. Currently
>> running MvBase/NT with probably 100 licensed seats. They say they're
>> spending approximately $50K/year on costs.

>> They are considering dumping the whole ball of wax and putting
>> everything on MS Access. I'm getting more specific cost info now,
>> but I know that they have OE, inventory, reporting, and all the
>> other functionality that goes with distribution. They just can't
>> handle the TCO with their current cash flow.

>> But I can't see them on MS access either. Is there a cheaper Pick
>> solution out there wich would allow them to migrate from Pick to
>> Pick? I believe that going to MS Access would be product-cheap and
>> labor-expensive.

>> Thanks for any ideas,

>> Ed

 
 
 

Switch from MvBase to MS Access?

Post by ashel.. » Sun, 27 Jul 2003 05:25:45


Why not switch to an open source database?  MySQL which is GPL i think
and Postgres SQL with has a BSD style liscense.  Both perform
amazingly well and have proven to be very stable.  

Access, although resonably cheap, isn't very multi user friendly +
ties you to client side microsoft lisceneses etc.  Pick is good but
for what you pay it isn't that great: especially for that size of
business not to mention RD isn't developping stuff fast enough for it.

jBase might be an alternative, i don't know how much liscensing and
maintenance costs, but still i think the open source solution would be
the best way to go.  Your only costs you will incur are the cost of
porting and retraining, which would probably be just slightly higher
than the access solution except you will have a better, higher
performance, scaleable solution: just in case the transactions
increase.

What we need is a group of capable people to start an open source pick
database product.  I'm sure that eventually you could easily convert
most everyone already on linux implementations of their commerical
linux based pick database to it:  if it was of quality/compatible.   A
business of strickly maintenance and development: allowing contracts /
pay per incident.  Hmmm.  That would be cool.

-Adam

On Fri, 25 Jul 2003 10:26:24 -0600, "Ed Sheehan"


>Gang,

>I have a client who process about 300 order per week. Currently running
>MvBase/NT with probably 100 licensed seats. They say they're spending
>approximately $50K/year on costs.

>They are considering dumping the whole ball of wax and putting everything on
>MS Access. I'm getting more specific cost info now, but I know that they
>have OE, inventory, reporting, and all the other functionality that goes
>with distribution. They just can't handle the TCO with their current cash
>flow.

>But I can't see them on MS access either. Is there a cheaper Pick solution
>out there wich would allow them to migrate from Pick to Pick? I believe that
>going to MS Access would be product-cheap and labor-expensive.

>Thanks for any ideas,

>Ed

 
 
 

Switch from MvBase to MS Access?

Post by BobJ » Sun, 27 Jul 2003 06:41:53


It appears that 2 or 3 users may be 1 or 2 too many, so his 50k annual is
not maintenance, etc.  If he has a good system running on MV Base and it
ain't broke, then don't fix it.  Scale him back to what he needs but keep
what works.  You could port him to jBase and probably improve his life a
bit, but you would have to buy whatever number of users he needs - and he
has already bought those from GA or RD, so why pay again?  The expense of
creating an application that fits the working model is always
underestimated - sometimes rather dramatically.  If he is smart enough to
run a small business at a profit then he is probably smart enough to see the
logic of not re-inventing the wheel.
BobJ

> Why not switch to an open source database?  MySQL which is GPL i think
> and Postgres SQL with has a BSD style liscense.  Both perform
> amazingly well and have proven to be very stable.

> Access, although resonably cheap, isn't very multi user friendly +
> ties you to client side microsoft lisceneses etc.  Pick is good but
> for what you pay it isn't that great: especially for that size of
> business not to mention RD isn't developping stuff fast enough for it.

> jBase might be an alternative, i don't know how much liscensing and
> maintenance costs, but still i think the open source solution would be
> the best way to go.  Your only costs you will incur are the cost of
> porting and retraining, which would probably be just slightly higher
> than the access solution except you will have a better, higher
> performance, scaleable solution: just in case the transactions
> increase.

> What we need is a group of capable people to start an open source pick
> database product.  I'm sure that eventually you could easily convert
> most everyone already on linux implementations of their commerical
> linux based pick database to it:  if it was of quality/compatible.   A
> business of strickly maintenance and development: allowing contracts /
> pay per incident.  Hmmm.  That would be cool.

> -Adam

> On Fri, 25 Jul 2003 10:26:24 -0600, "Ed Sheehan"

> >Gang,

> >I have a client who process about 300 order per week. Currently running
> >MvBase/NT with probably 100 licensed seats. They say they're spending
> >approximately $50K/year on costs.

> >They are considering dumping the whole ball of wax and putting everything
on
> >MS Access. I'm getting more specific cost info now, but I know that they
> >have OE, inventory, reporting, and all the other functionality that goes
> >with distribution. They just can't handle the TCO with their current cash
> >flow.

> >But I can't see them on MS access either. Is there a cheaper Pick
solution
> >out there wich would allow them to migrate from Pick to Pick? I believe
that
> >going to MS Access would be product-cheap and labor-expensive.

> >Thanks for any ideas,

> >Ed

 
 
 

Switch from MvBase to MS Access?

Post by ashel.. » Sun, 27 Jul 2003 07:26:35


I agree with you 100%.  When i first read the post it sounded as if
the application was costing him 50,000 a year, which wouldn't surprise
me if you are running an application running on a RD database
platform.

>It appears that 2 or 3 users may be 1 or 2 too many, so his 50k annual is
>not maintenance, etc.  If he has a good system running on MV Base and it
>ain't broke, then don't fix it.  Scale him back to what he needs but keep
>what works.  You could port him to jBase and probably improve his life a
>bit, but you would have to buy whatever number of users he needs - and he
>has already bought those from GA or RD, so why pay again?  The expense of
>creating an application that fits the working model is always
>underestimated - sometimes rather dramatically.  If he is smart enough to
>run a small business at a profit then he is probably smart enough to see the
>logic of not re-inventing the wheel.
>BobJ


>> Why not switch to an open source database?  MySQL which is GPL i think
>> and Postgres SQL with has a BSD style liscense.  Both perform
>> amazingly well and have proven to be very stable.

>> Access, although resonably cheap, isn't very multi user friendly +
>> ties you to client side microsoft lisceneses etc.  Pick is good but
>> for what you pay it isn't that great: especially for that size of
>> business not to mention RD isn't developping stuff fast enough for it.

>> jBase might be an alternative, i don't know how much liscensing and
>> maintenance costs, but still i think the open source solution would be
>> the best way to go.  Your only costs you will incur are the cost of
>> porting and retraining, which would probably be just slightly higher
>> than the access solution except you will have a better, higher
>> performance, scaleable solution: just in case the transactions
>> increase.

>> What we need is a group of capable people to start an open source pick
>> database product.  I'm sure that eventually you could easily convert
>> most everyone already on linux implementations of their commerical
>> linux based pick database to it:  if it was of quality/compatible.   A
>> business of strickly maintenance and development: allowing contracts /
>> pay per incident.  Hmmm.  That would be cool.

>> -Adam

 
 
 

Switch from MvBase to MS Access?

Post by Patrick Pay » Sun, 27 Jul 2003 07:30:42


The whole thing sounds suspect.  How does one get the support cost of
a Mv/base application to $50,000?  The only thought I have is that
there must be an Employee cost included there, or a consultant is
getting a bunch of money from them.

If the cost is an employee, this charge will not go away, and may even
go up.

Secondly, they must be talking about going to a ACCESS based front end
application with a SQL Server backend.  As another poster stated the
Access Database is not able to handle any type of real load, it is
primarily a single user database.

Finally, a Access and/or VB front end application is going to possible
require new hardware on the client ends.  Old machines will not be
able to run a Gui app quickly.

- Patrick


> Did someone fail to mention to them that MS suggests that Access is not good
> for more than five users???  Actually, those most be pretty big orders if
> there are only 300 in a week and they have been supporting the kind of
> overhead that is implied with your numbers.
> I have seen very complete order entry and accounting systems on MS Access
> but they were not cheap to implement, taking many man months of effort.
> Also, 50k per year won't even pay for the administrator that they are going
> to have to have if they go to a "main line" implementation.
> Perhaps you need to dig a little deeper.
> BobJ


> > Gang,

> > I have a client who process about 300 order per week. Currently running
> > MvBase/NT with probably 100 licensed seats. They say they're spending
> > approximately $50K/year on costs.

> > They are considering dumping the whole ball of wax and putting everything
>  on
> > MS Access. I'm getting more specific cost info now, but I know that they
> > have OE, inventory, reporting, and all the other functionality that goes
> > with distribution. They just can't handle the TCO with their current cash
> > flow.

> > But I can't see them on MS access either. Is there a cheaper Pick solution
> > out there wich would allow them to migrate from Pick to Pick? I believe
>  that
> > going to MS Access would be product-cheap and labor-expensive.

> > Thanks for any ideas,

> > Ed

 
 
 

Switch from MvBase to MS Access?

Post by Excalibu » Sun, 27 Jul 2003 07:53:53


Hi
First Question.  Do they need 100 seats, do they really have this many
active sessions at once.
 
 
 

Switch from MvBase to MS Access?

Post by Simon Veron » Sun, 27 Jul 2003 08:49:51


I actually thought I'd misread some of the posts...  I just assumed that 100
seats really meant 10!  I can't see how 12 employees can use 100 licences!
No wonder the cost is so high!

I would have thought just scaling back to 6 supported licences would reduce
the costs substantially.

Any application or employee costs that make up the remainder of the 50K
would probably remain in any case.

I don't keep track of Raining Data's support+maintenance fees, but if they
are that expensive, then moving to jBase would probably be the best bet.

I would have thought that comparing to the above, rewriting a functional
application or buying in a new one would be overly costing in terms of
capital expense, compared to any long term savings.

Regards

--
==============================
Simon Verona

==============================

Quote:> Hi
> First Question.  Do they need 100 seats, do they really have this many
> active sessions at once.

 
 
 

Switch from MvBase to MS Access?

Post by PickCode » Sun, 27 Jul 2003 09:08:25


On Fri, 25 Jul 2003 13:10:54 -0600, "Ed Sheehan"

   Based on that info, each of the 12 employees is expensed at $3 an
hour. That sounds goofy. What are they doing when they're not making
revenue for the company? Wouldn't the $3 expense, to enter an hours
worth of orders, offset the expense itself? If the margins are SO low,
that the employee's revenue making time is a question, then maybe it's
time to look at all the *other* overhead. 2 minutes an order is very
quick, especially if you have to enter new customer information. 3
minutes to pack and ship a product is blazing fast! Something is wrong
with the entire picture, if you ask me.

  What are they doing during the other 15 hours a week, while getting
paid? How much are they getting paid to not make direct revenue?  I've
done lots of cost analytics at my current employer. If you take every
keystroke to be a revenue loss, then you're just digging in the mud to
find dirt. If this is a distribution company, get me some *real*
numbers and drop me an e-mail. I'd be happy to go over the current
budget(if there IS one), review the software setup, and offer some
streamlining and cost-cutting suggestions. I've done a LOT of
streamlining and cost-cutting at All-Spec, since we run on very low
margins with less employees than we should. As the business has grown,
we've spent time and money to automate processes, and streamline data
access. The inital expense is quickly recouped in employee time
savings.

 Switching to MS Access will end up costing tons more in design costs,
as well as time loss. Do a green screen to GUI comparison and you'll
see that it takes quite a bit more time to enter data using a mouse
and a keyboard together. Also, Access isn't the fastest database for
large amounts of data, without some major iron running it, by itself.

 BTW, from what I've heard, MvBase is more expensive to have support
for, than D3. Switch to D3/Linux and your overhead will probably drop
by a significant amount. Though, I could be wrong.

Glen
http://picksource.com/phpnuke/

>Further info:

>Total Employees : 12
>Desired Employees: 6

>The $50K costs are from the employees. The owner spends ~ 3 min per order
>taken, ~2 min more to ship. At 300 orders/week, that's ~ 1500 minutes or 25
>hours/week spent on most of the business. He can't justify the number of
>employees he has, so after an analysis of who really does what, he intends
>to make the switch.

>I am attempting to persuade him to reduce the complexity of the Pick
>software, so that if/when the business expands, he can re-scale back to
>where he was with way less growing pains than moving back from MS Access.
>That would seem to let him have the best of both worlds: Easier software
>tasking, with built-in bounce-back when the time is right.

>I think the initial costs would be to provide a software/menu subset of what
>they're currently using, retaining file structures, and allowing an improved
>workflow/menu navigation for better ease-of-use for new/green employees.
>Sort of simplifying the business rules.

>We usually think of adding more capability/complexity when dealing with
>companies, but these days, a retraction may be what's needed, at least for
>the short term.

>Ed


>> What percentage of there gross sales per year is that 50K?  What is
>> their overall layout for IT as compared to their gross sales?



>>> Gang,

>>> I have a client who process about 300 order per week. Currently
>>> running MvBase/NT with probably 100 licensed seats. They say they're
>>> spending approximately $50K/year on costs.

>>> They are considering dumping the whole ball of wax and putting
>>> everything on MS Access. I'm getting more specific cost info now,
>>> but I know that they have OE, inventory, reporting, and all the
>>> other functionality that goes with distribution. They just can't
>>> handle the TCO with their current cash flow.

>>> But I can't see them on MS access either. Is there a cheaper Pick
>>> solution out there wich would allow them to migrate from Pick to
>>> Pick? I believe that going to MS Access would be product-cheap and
>>> labor-expensive.

>>> Thanks for any ideas,

>>> Ed

 
 
 

Switch from MvBase to MS Access?

Post by Tony Gravagn » Sun, 27 Jul 2003 11:21:17


Ed, I think it would really help if you can explain how 12 people are
using 100 licenses.  Maybe the whole point is that they have 100
licenses and only have 12 employees, so why pay support on the extra
88 licenses?  If you can't negotiate with RD on this then cancel the
100 user contract and purchase a new 12 user contract, no?

I think the trick for the end-user is to work smarter, not harder.  If
it takes x minutes to enter an order then cut that down.  Switching to
a new platform does not in any way guarantee that it will take less
time in the end to enter the same volume of orders.  The answer is to
fundamentally change the way orders are processed.  I know this goes
against your thinking but I think the answer is to try to automate the
order entry process.  Get their clients to pump orders in via EDI,
SOAP, web pages, or some other way so that employees don't spend their
time doing data entry.

About MS Access: Nope.  If you're going to go for another DBMS due to
costs, then like others, I'd suggest MySQL with a front-end that is
designed to cut down data entry time.  Access doesn't scale and you
don't want to have to jump into SQL Server as soon as you have Access
up and overloaded.

It keeps coming back to how they do business, the front-end for data
entry (re-do it or lose it), and the business rules.  I don't think
this is a DBMS thing based on the info available.  If they migrate out
of MV in order to cut costs then they're still going to need to find a
new application and suitable business rules.  That just runs up
purchase and/or development costs.

More info would help...
Good Luck in any case.

Tony


>Gang,

>I have a client who process about 300 order per week. Currently running
>MvBase/NT with probably 100 licensed seats. They say they're spending
>approximately $50K/year on costs.

>They are considering dumping the whole ball of wax and putting everything on
>MS Access. I'm getting more specific cost info now, but I know that they
>have OE, inventory, reporting, and all the other functionality that goes
>with distribution. They just can't handle the TCO with their current cash
>flow.

>But I can't see them on MS access either. Is there a cheaper Pick solution
>out there wich would allow them to migrate from Pick to Pick? I believe that
>going to MS Access would be product-cheap and labor-expensive.

>Thanks for any ideas,

>Ed

 
 
 

Switch from MvBase to MS Access?

Post by rg » Sun, 27 Jul 2003 12:02:28


Ed

Okay.  I'm confused.  The owner thinks that by switching from Pick
to Access he is going to be able to eliminate 6 people?    Why?
What does it really have to do with Pick.  If the owner wants a
cheaper system, let him go QuickBooks or Peachtree (blech).

Pick.  Quickbooks.  Whatever, somebody has to do the data entry.
Are you saying the current application needs 6 people to do 25 hours
of work?  In which case, I'd agree with the owner.  But he will need
to lower his expectations.

And if he switches to Access.  Does that mean he found an already
written application that he is able to live with?    Which will be
free? And is he aware of what Bobj says about M$ warnings about user
limits?

Is the owner willing to spend money on the new system that will
allow him to eliminate 6 people?  How much?  Maybe you could use
that amount to pare down your applications.   Such as, does the
customer use/need accounts receivable or is it more cash & carry?
Shutdown A/R?

Customer once needed 100 seats and now has only 12 employees?
Quite a meltdown.

good luck
Roger Glenfield


> Further info:

> Total Employees : 12
> Desired Employees: 6

> The $50K costs are from the employees. The owner spends ~ 3 min
per order
> taken, ~2 min more to ship. At 300 orders/week, that's ~ 1500
minutes or 25
> hours/week spent on most of the business. He can't justify the
number of
> employees he has, so after an analysis of who really does what, he
intends
> to make the switch.

> I am attempting to persuade him to reduce the complexity of the
Pick
> software, so that if/when the business expands, he can re-scale
back to
> where he was with way less growing pains than moving back from MS
Access.
> That would seem to let him have the best of both worlds: Easier
software
> tasking, with built-in bounce-back when the time is right.

> I think the initial costs would be to provide a software/menu
subset of what
> they're currently using, retaining file structures, and allowing
an improved
> workflow/menu navigation for better ease-of-use for new/green
employees.
> Sort of simplifying the business rules.

> We usually think of adding more capability/complexity when dealing
with
> companies, but these days, a retraction may be what's needed, at
least for
> the short term.

> Ed


> > What percentage of there gross sales per year is that 50K?  What
is
> > their overall layout for IT as compared to their gross sales?



> >> Gang,

> >> I have a client who process about 300 order per week. Currently
> >> running MvBase/NT with probably 100 licensed seats. They say
they're
> >> spending approximately $50K/year on costs.

> >> They are considering dumping the whole ball of wax and putting
> >> everything on MS Access. I'm getting more specific cost info
now,
> >> but I know that they have OE, inventory, reporting, and all the
> >> other functionality that goes with distribution. They just
can't
> >> handle the TCO with their current cash flow.

> >> But I can't see them on MS access either. Is there a cheaper
Pick
> >> solution out there wich would allow them to migrate from Pick
to
> >> Pick? I believe that going to MS Access would be product-cheap
and
> >> labor-expensive.

> >> Thanks for any ideas,

> >> Ed

 
 
 

Switch from MvBase to MS Access?

Post by Homer L. Haze » Sun, 27 Jul 2003 12:31:54


ashelley - you say you are not surprised by a Raining Database
that costs $50,000 per year for support.  Man, I'd like to be able
to work at a site like that.  Most of my clients balk at paying the
$2,000 or $3,000 maintenance fee Raining Data charges.  My clients
generally range from 20 to 30 users and trust me, I'm not making anywhere
near 50,000 from any of them.  I just don't see how a Raining Data system
can generate an application cost of $50,000 per year for only 6 employees.

Larry Hazel


Quote:> I agree with you 100%.  When i first read the post it sounded as if
> the application was costing him 50,000 a year, which wouldn't surprise
> me if you are running an application running on a RD database
> platform.

<snip>
 
 
 

Switch from MvBase to MS Access?

Post by Mecki Foerthman » Sun, 27 Jul 2003 19:58:35



> Further info:

> Total Employees : 12
> Desired Employees: 6

> The $50K costs are from the employees.

Ed, if he pays his people so poorly (That's less  than $350/month before
tax), how do you expect ever to get paid yourself?
Either that man is a sweat-shop slave-driver and/or a crook or his workforce
must be braindead!
If you pay peanuts - you only get monkeys or illegal immigrants!
And if he pays maintenance for 100 licenses (what's the annual license fee
$75 or 80 per seat?), he has to be extremely stupid to boot.
But I suppose, he hasn't even got a maintenance license agreement and bought
the computer with the software in a car boot sale in some dark alley.

Quote:> The owner spends ~ 3 min per
> order taken, ~2 min more to ship. At 300 orders/week, that's ~ 1500
> minutes or 25 hours/week spent on most of the business. He can't
> justify the number of employees he has, so after an analysis of who
> really does what, he intends to make the switch.

If he can do all the work in 25 hrs/week all by himself, what the heck does
he need any employees at all for?
And if he fires half of them, what do the rest of them do all week, pick
their noses?
So obviously he isn't just greedy and stupid, he is also unbelievably lazy.
Or is there something sinister going on?

I'd keep away from that guy, if I were you. ;-)

 
 
 

1. Justify the switch to MS SQL from Access 97

I work at a fulfillment company and currently all our databases are in
Access 97.
Could anyone help me out and give me a few solid reasons to migrate to
SQL server.
There is no doubt in my mind that this will be to our benefit
(especially when 7 people are simultaneously sharing 1 .mdb)

Simon Romanski

2. SQL*reports in landscape mode on HP (nospam directions)

3. Switching MS Certificate Server from Access to SQL Server 7

4. Inline views

5. CA-MILPITAS-111217--Management-MS Office-MS Word-MS Excel-MS ACCESS-ORACLE-GROUP CONTROLLER

6. VB5.5 problems with object lib

7. Email/Faxing/Printing from mvBase/NT via MS Word

8. Monolith Megacom and MS NT/MvBase