Relational vs Object-Oriented Databases

Relational vs Object-Oriented Databases

Post by Jay God » Wed, 05 Jan 1994 01:09:54



Greetings.

We are working on a telecommunications product, and we may
choose a commercial database. The software architecture is
OO, and there will be a relatively large number of classes.
There will be active and passive objects (it is a real-time system).

One of the first decisions we have to make is if we pick a
relational database or an object-oriented database.I have been
reading many articles lately and most, if not all, are trumpeting
the merits of object-oriented databases. I almost believe them.
However, I have not seen any articles that favour relational
databases over OO databases.

Does anybody out there know of any good technical reasons why one
would choose a relational database over an OO database? Are there
any articles out there that promote relational databases over
OO databases (for our application)? Would a relational database
with an OO wrapper be better than an OO database?

Please post responses to comp.databases.theory and/or please
e-mail me at:  


--

Bell-Northern Research, PO Box 3511, Staion C, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
Disclaimer: The views presented in this article are not neccessarily
            those of Bell-Northern Research

 
 
 

Relational vs Object-Oriented Databases

Post by Eric Kolotyl » Wed, 05 Jan 1994 05:45:28


The bigest advantage to using a relational database is that most of the commercial
ones are well established, well debugged, well supported, overall reliable
technology.  Technically, it is also easier to make schema modifications, as
the current state-of-the-art in schema modification of OODBs is still young.

If you want the best of both worlds there are packages that combine both
relational and OO techniques.  One product I've tried is Persistence

pump out a whole lot of boiler-plate code for an OO front end in C++ for
either Sybase or Oracle for either an existing or a new database.  This
can dramatically reduce development time.  Also, if you're doing a GUI
for your database, the OO front end can make writing the GUI much simpler.

There are also other products around, but Persistence is the only one I've
tried.

I've also tried ObjectStore, which is probably the leading pure OODB on the
market.  It's nice, but lacks many features like a user level querey language.
Also, our experience with ObjectStore is that it is not as reliable as Sybase.
However, if you want an extremely efficient OODB, ObjectStore is probably a
good choice.

- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -


Greetings.

We are working on a telecommunications product, and we may
choose a commercial database. The software architecture is
OO, and there will be a relatively large number of classes.
There will be active and passive objects (it is a real-time system).

One of the first decisions we have to make is if we pick a
relational database or an object-oriented database.I have been
reading many articles lately and most, if not all, are trumpeting
the merits of object-oriented databases. I almost believe them.
However, I have not seen any articles that favour relational
databases over OO databases.

Does anybody out there know of any good technical reasons why one
would choose a relational database over an OO database? Are there
any articles out there that promote relational databases over
OO databases (for our application)? Would a relational database
with an OO wrapper be better than an OO database?

Please post responses to comp.databases.theory and/or please
e-mail me at:  


--

Bell-Northern Research, PO Box 3511, Staion C, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
Disclaimer: The views presented in this article are not neccessarily
            those of Bell-Northern Research

 
 
 

Relational vs Object-Oriented Databases

Post by Hartmut Schreib » Wed, 05 Jan 1994 17:42:14



Quote:(Eric Kolotyluk) writes:

|>
|> However, if you want an extremely efficient OODB, ObjectStore is probably a
|> good choice.
|>

Should this be the reason why ODI refused to participate in the OO7 (and other)
benchmark tests?


   By failing to prepare, you are preparing to fail.

 
 
 

Relational vs Object-Oriented Databases

Post by Jack Orenste » Wed, 05 Jan 1994 20:27:54



   (Eric Kolotyluk) writes:
   |>
   |> However, if you want an extremely efficient OODB, ObjectStore is probably a
   |> good choice.
   |>

   Should this be the reason why ODI refused to participate in the OO7 (and other)
   benchmark tests?

If anyone is interested in our oo7 results, please ftp to
ftp.odi.com and look in pub/oo7.

Jack Orenstein
Object Design, Inc.

 
 
 

Relational vs Object-Oriented Databases

Post by Hartmut Schreib » Thu, 06 Jan 1994 03:18:22


|>
|> If anyone is interested in our oo7 results, please ftp to
|> ftp.odi.com and look in pub/oo7.
|>
|> Jack Orenstein
|> Object Design, Inc.

Could you please refer us to a slightly more independent source?


 
 
 

Relational vs Object-Oriented Databases

Post by wei-pang.ch » Sat, 15 Jan 1994 02:07:34


-- Due to not sure about whether the following message has been
posted successfully the 1st time, I am reposting it.

We are also looking for DBMS for similar Real Time applications.
Our DB has to be completely core resident (assuming no memory
constraints) with backup on the disks and has to be able to port on top
of the commercially available real time operating system (e.g., VxWorks,
Chorus, Window NT, etc.)

Dynamic schema changes and on-line evolutions are desired.

We tend to choose commercial OODBs, or relational or network DBs
with OO wrapping that meets the above minimum "requirements".

Anybody with the experiences of Raima Client-Server model or
Data Manager?

Please post your replies in "comp.databases.theory" or e-mail
to me at

Thank you.

Wei-Pang Chin
AT&T Bell Labs

--------------------------------------------------------------

>Greetings.

>We are working on a telecommunications product, and we may
>choose a commercial database. The software architecture is
>OO, and there will be a relatively large number of classes.
>There will be active and passive objects (it is a real-time system).

>One of the first decisions we have to make is if we pick a
>relational database or an object-oriented database.I have been
>reading many articles lately and most, if not all, are trumpeting
>the merits of object-oriented databases. I almost believe them.
>However, I have not seen any articles that favour relational
>databases over OO databases.

>Does anybody out there know of any good technical reasons why one
>would choose a relational database over an OO database? Are there
>any articles out there that promote relational databases over
>OO databases (for our application)? Would a relational database
>with an OO wrapper be better than an OO database?

>Please post responses to comp.databases.theory and/or please
>e-mail me at:  


>--

>Bell-Northern Research, PO Box 3511, Staion C, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
>Disclaimer: The views presented in this article are not neccessarily
>            those of Bell-Northern Research

 
 
 

Relational vs Object-Oriented Databases

Post by Jon Hig » Sat, 15 Jan 1994 07:09:27




> -- Due to not sure about whether the following message has been
> posted successfully the 1st time, I am reposting it.

I saw it the first time.  I'll post something this time.

Quote:

> We are also looking for DBMS for similar Real Time applications.
> Our DB has to be completely core resident (assuming no memory
> constraints) with backup on the disks and has to be able to port on top
> of the commercially available real time operating system (e.g., VxWorks,
> Chorus, Window NT, etc.)

> Dynamic schema changes and on-line evolutions are desired.

> We tend to choose commercial OODBs, or relational or network DBs
> with OO wrapping that meets the above minimum "requirements".

> Anybody with the experiences of Raima Client-Server model or
> Data Manager?

In a previous job/life, we used the Raima database (under OS/2) in its'
network model.  The project was for a Point of Sale (POS) network which
needed to handle gas pumps, online credit network, credit terminals, tank
sensor, etc.  Not a critical real-time system, but had its' hands full.
I found the product to be very usable with no performance problems. I
think the decision kicker for choosing the Raima database was that there
was no run-time license required (marketing/sales plans forcasted around
10,000 units).  The Raima database can be used in either a network model or
a relational model.  The network model (in our tests) beat the pants off
of the relation model.  The only problems I recall were attempting to produce
some reports where the relational model would have been much simpler.
Such is this case - your choices tend to mirror the 90% case, the other 10%
you just have to grunt out.

> Please post your replies in "comp.databases.theory" or e-mail
> to me at

> Thank you.

> Wei-Pang Chin
> AT&T Bell Labs

> --------------------------------------------------------------

[Putting on flame suit now ...]

Take a look at our products : UniSQL/X and UniSQL/M.  We provides a
hybrid between OODB and RDB.  It is a SQL compliant RDB with object
oriented extensions.  

The OO extensions include classes, multiple inheritance, polymorphism,
methods and support for sets (sets, multi-sets and sequences). Dynamic
schema changes are also supported. Our classes are also "first-class"
objects which means you can access a class object to determine its':
attributes, inheritance structure, domains, methods, etc.

The RDB side supports standard SQL with some SQL extensions to provide
access to the added capabilities of our database.  Standard RDB features
(as is the case with most all RDB products): online backups,
client/server architecture which supports lots of users, ability to
handle large databases (gigs), etc.

Access: Embedded SQL (ESQL), C API, C++ API, UniSQL 4GE Tools.

If you would like any additional information (like a propoganda kit with our
"White Paper") or have other questions, please feel free to email me.

Jon
---
Jon Higby
Technical Services Consultant
UniSQL, Inc.
Austin, Texas


--
************************************************************************
The easiest way to teach children the value of money is to borrow from them
************************************************************************

 
 
 

1. curious: relational vs object oriented databases

Just wondering...

Delphi provides tools for creating & maintaining relational
databases, but what about object-oriented ones?  Are OODs
used much?  I would think there would be advantages for
modelling real-world systems, but perhaps relational technology
is good enough, besides being well established.  Any thoughts?

--
Ken Irving                ...eschew obfuscation
SysTech Control
Fairbanks  AK  

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