Ancient Database Program --- How do I convert to dBASE???

Ancient Database Program --- How do I convert to dBASE???

Post by ko.. » Thu, 08 Sep 1994 03:39:38



Hello!

I have an old database program that I purchased from Hoyle and Hoyle Software
in 1983 (Yes, that's right...1983) called General Database version 2:02.  It
suited my needs fine until recently.  Now I want to convert over 10 years worth
of accumulated data to dBASE.  However, dBASE (or any other database program I
tried) cannot recognize the format.  There must be a way to keep this data
without re-typing all of it ... but I don't know how.  Does anyone know of any
filters that will allow me to convert non-dBASE data to dBASE data...or even
to ASCII???

Any help on this matter would be greatly appreciated.  Thank you!!


Seihun Kong
UF Environmental Engineering Sciences Department
Gainesville, FL

 
 
 

Ancient Database Program --- How do I convert to dBASE???

Post by Joseph Saturn » Fri, 09 Sep 1994 01:08:43



>I have an old database program that I purchased from
>Hoyle and Hoyle Software  in 1983 (Yes, that's
>right...1983) called General Database version 2:02.  It
> suited my needs fine until recently.  Now I want to
>convert over 10 years worth  of accumulated data to
>dBASE.  However, dBASE (or any other database program I
> tried) cannot recognize the format.  There must be a
>way to keep this data  without re-typing all of it ...
>but I don't know how.  Does anyone know of any  filters
>that will allow me to convert non-dBASE data to dBASE
>data...or even  to ASCII???

Does the database software have an export routine to ASCII?  If
not, does it have a macro language that will allow you to read
a record at a time and write to an ASCII file?

 
 
 

Ancient Database Program --- How do I convert to dBASE???

Post by SCHRISTEN.. » Sat, 10 Sep 1994 12:28:53




>>I have an old database program that I purchased from
>>Hoyle and Hoyle Software  in 1983 (Yes, that's
>>right...1983) called General Database version 2:02.  It
>> suited my needs fine until recently.  Now I want to
>>convert over 10 years worth  of accumulated data to
>>dBASE.  However, dBASE (or any other database program I
>> tried) cannot recognize the format.  There must be a
>>way to keep this data  without re-typing all of it ...
>>but I don't know how.  Does anyone know of any  filters
>>that will allow me to convert non-dBASE data to dBASE
>>data...or even  to ASCII???
>Does the database software have an export routine to ASCII?  If
>not, does it have a macro language that will allow you to read
>a record at a time and write to an ASCII file?

If nobody comes up with a program, you might try calling up a file as
text into a word processing program. I routinely convert dBASE files to
WordPerfect merge files with a macro I wrote. The trick, of course, is to
see whether there are characters delimiting fields and records that you
can search and replace. This is a bit of a cheat since the dBASE files
are copied to an .sdf delimited format.

I have converted PC-file 1.0 files to dBASE using a BASIC program.
PC-file 1.0 was a little different in that it had a header to the data
file that showed how many characters each field took. It was pretty easy
to write a BASIC program that would read a field's worth of characters,
write them to another file that would add the dBASE delimiters, read
another field, and continue through all the records.

The start is to see what you've got there using a text editor, Norton
Utilities, or whatever.

 
 
 

Ancient Database Program --- How do I convert to dBASE???

Post by EvroSyste » Sun, 11 Sep 1994 20:32:29


Call Tools & Techniques and see if Data Junction can handle this.  Data
Junction is an app that can convert a zillion database formats into other
formats, in interactive or batch mode.
 
 
 

Ancient Database Program --- How do I convert to dBASE???

Post by Bob Woodwa » Thu, 15 Sep 1994 23:38:46



>Subject: Re: Ancient Database Program --- How do I convert to dBASE???

>Date: 7 Sep 1994 12:08:43 -0400

>>I have an old database program that I purchased from
>>Hoyle and Hoyle Software  in 1983 (Yes, that's
>>right...1983) called General Database version 2:02.  It
>> suited my needs fine until recently.  Now I want to
>>convert over 10 years worth  of accumulated data to
>>dBASE.  However, dBASE (or any other database program I
>> tried) cannot recognize the format.  There must be a
>>way to keep this data  without re-typing all of it ...
>>but I don't know how.  Does anyone know of any  filters
>>that will allow me to convert non-dBASE data to dBASE
>>data...or even  to ASCII???
>Does the database software have an export routine to ASCII?  If
>not, does it have a macro language that will allow you to read
>a record at a time and write to an ASCII file?

If all else fails, you can capture maintenance reports to a disk file.  This
MAKES ASCII files which can then be imported as a fixed length file.  If you
DON'T have "maintenance reports" that are just plain listings of data in your
files, your probably going to have to "hack" the files through one of the
methods others have listed here.

Good luck.

 
 
 

Ancient Database Program --- How do I convert to dBASE???

Post by Rusty Fulch » Mon, 19 Sep 1994 09:29:40


Have you tried a delimited file.
Take a look at FoxPro.
Bye
 
 
 

Ancient Database Program --- How do I convert to dBASE???

Post by Amy Edwar » Wed, 21 Sep 1994 07:06:38


Quote:> >>I have an old database program that I purchased from
> >>Hoyle and Hoyle Software  in 1983 (Yes, that's
> >>right...1983) called General Database version 2:02.  It
> >> suited my needs fine until recently.  Now I want to
> >>convert over 10 years worth  of accumulated data to
> >>dBASE.  However, dBASE (or any other database program I
> >> tried) cannot recognize the format.  There must be a
> >>way to keep this data  without re-typing all of it ...
> >>but I don't know how.  Does anyone know of any  filters
> >>that will allow me to convert non-dBASE data to dBASE
> >>data...or even  to ASCII???

dBase IV can read several types of data files, but it needs to know what
type of file it is reading: ASCII, delimited txt, system data format
(extension SDF), document interchange format (extension DIF), symbolic link
format (extension SYLK), PFS:FILE format, RapidFile format (extension RPD),
Lotus format (extension WK1).  You will need to know which type of file the
data is saved in, or be able to save it in a form that dBase can read.  If
none of the file extensions look right see if you can decide how the data
was stored by looking at the file from DOS.  The programs manual should
also tell you how it is saving the data, on some back page in really small
type.

ASCII are just characters and spaces (like a text file).  
Delimited format files have the fields separated by a specific aharacter
(like a quotation mark and or camas) or a space (blank delimited).  The
most common character delimited format is to put quotation marks around the
data in each field, separate the fields by commas, and the records by
carriage returns.  
Many spreadsheet programs store data in SDF format, where the fields have a
fixed length (number of spaces) and records are separated by a carriage
return.  The raw data looks much like a table, with the fields forming
columns.  A SDF formated file could also be called a: flat file,
fixed-length file, or DOS text file.  
Microsoft developed SYLK format for data exchange between their graphic,
spreadsheet and data base programs.  
DIF format has been used by several spreadsheat and database programs, it
looks similar to the delimited file format.  
WKS and WK1 formats are Lotus/Symphony product file exchange formats.  

Most database programs can save data as ASCII, delimited or SDF formated
files.  Try those file types first.

To transfer data into dBase you must use the APPEND command.  That means
you need to have a database already setup for the transfer.  Make sure it
has the same number of fields as the old database does.

After setting up the new database go to the dot prompt and type in:

APPEND FROM filename TYPE type

where filename = the name of the file to be transfered
and type = one of the dBase acceptable formats:
  DELIMITED [WITH]
*the WITH parameter lets you designate the character used the defalt
character is the question mark*
  DIF
  FW2
  RPD
  SDF
  SYLK
  WKS
  WK1

Use a small data set to test the various file types.  If you indicate the
wrong type of file you will either be told dBase can't transfer the data or
you will get junk.  

If none of these formats works see if you can open the file in a
wordprocessing program.  I have found that Microsoft Word is a good go
between for several types of files.  It adds an extra step to the transfer,
but still beats reentering the data.

Good luck
Amy