Linux NFS with HP-UX NFS

Linux NFS with HP-UX NFS

Post by David Traver » Wed, 19 Aug 1998 04:00:00



I am currently working on trying to get HP-UX 10.30 running on an HP 900
K200 to talk to Redhat Linux 5.0 running on an Intel Pentium PC.

I have NFS setup on both platforms and they can talk to each other no
problem. I can copy data files to and from the exported and mounted
directories.

However when I try to open Unidata  files stored on the Linux box to the HP
, UniData complains that it cannot create locks, and data cannot be written
to the file or read from it. I have tried changing read/write block sizes
but this makes no difference.

1) Has anyone tried to do this before or between different platforms e.g
RS600, AS400.

2) Is possibly something to with the Linux file system  type. Linux does
support other file systems.

I would be most interested to hear from you.

David Travers
Blairs of Scotland

 
 
 

Linux NFS with HP-UX NFS

Post by Ken Walli » Thu, 20 Aug 1998 04:00:00



>I am currently working on trying to get HP-UX 10.30 running on an HP 900
>K200 to talk to Redhat Linux 5.0 running on an Intel Pentium PC.

>I have NFS setup on both platforms and they can talk to each other no
>problem. I can copy data files to and from the exported and mounted
>directories.

>However when I try to open Unidata  files stored on the Linux box to the HP
>, UniData complains that it cannot create locks, and data cannot be written
>to the file or read from it. I have tried changing read/write block sizes
>but this makes no difference.

Unidata uses extent locks when it accesses files.  Not all implementations
of NFS support extent locking, some promote extent locks to file locks,
others just say no!

I am aware of sites who have successfully used NFS between different
platforms and seem to remember Sun and DEC figuring in this.

Be aware that even on platforms which support extent locking across NFS
there is no logical lock protection.  Processes on both platforms would be
able to successfully gain a READU lock on the same record in the same file
if it were simply shared using NFS.  If they both updated it the extent
locking would ensure that file integrity was maintained, and either one or
other of the updates would work, but logically you'd be stuffed.

UniData NFA is designed to support file sharing between boxes.

--
Ken Wallis

Empower Data Solutions Pty Limited, ACN 079 955 196

Envision, enable, enhance... empower

 
 
 

Linux NFS with HP-UX NFS

Post by Anthony W. Youngma » Thu, 20 Aug 1998 04:00:00





>>I am currently working on trying to get HP-UX 10.30 running on an HP 900
>>K200 to talk to Redhat Linux 5.0 running on an Intel Pentium PC.

>>I have NFS setup on both platforms and they can talk to each other no
>>problem. I can copy data files to and from the exported and mounted
>>directories.

>>However when I try to open Unidata  files stored on the Linux box to the HP
>>, UniData complains that it cannot create locks, and data cannot be written
>>to the file or read from it. I have tried changing read/write block sizes
>>but this makes no difference.

>Unidata uses extent locks when it accesses files.  Not all implementations
>of NFS support extent locking, some promote extent locks to file locks,
>others just say no!

>I am aware of sites who have successfully used NFS between different
>platforms and seem to remember Sun and DEC figuring in this.

>Be aware that even on platforms which support extent locking across NFS
>there is no logical lock protection.  Processes on both platforms would be
>able to successfully gain a READU lock on the same record in the same file
>if it were simply shared using NFS.  If they both updated it the extent
>locking would ensure that file integrity was maintained, and either one or
>other of the updates would work, but logically you'd be stuffed.

>UniData NFA is designed to support file sharing between boxes.

Obviously Information is a different product ... but to the best of my
knowledge that will only access local files. Data Integrity is enforced
across a network by only allowing the database engines to access the
files so you need to run Information on both machines in order to
network. UniVerse may work the same way, as Prime networking is
reputedly a component VMark were keen to obtain when they bought Prime
(what was left of it).
--
Anthony W. Youngman - wol at thewolery dot demon dot co dot uk
Trousers with a single hole in their waistband are topologically equivalent
to a doughnut. These sugarcoated trousers have yet to catch on at fast-food
outlets! (SuperStrings by F. David Peat)

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