Deleting fields

Deleting fields

Post by Jack » Sun, 06 Jul 2003 08:15:30



A long time ago (on this forum I believe), there was a discussion on
deleting fields.  It was advised never to delete fields in an
established database as it could mess up the database somehow.

My goal is to overhaul our existing database which has many unused
fields.  I was hoping that I could save the database as an empty
clone, delete the unused fields, then import the data back into the
cleaner database that I would avoid any problems with deleted fields.

Does anyone have advice on this subject?

Thanks,
Jackie

 
 
 

Deleting fields

Post by Helpful Harr » Sun, 06 Jul 2003 08:29:50




> A long time ago (on this forum I believe), there was a discussion on
> deleting fields.  It was advised never to delete fields in an
> established database as it could mess up the database somehow.

> My goal is to overhaul our existing database which has many unused
> fields.  I was hoping that I could save the database as an empty
> clone, delete the unused fields, then import the data back into the
> cleaner database that I would avoid any problems with deleted fields.

> Does anyone have advice on this subject?

> Thanks,
> Jackie

The problem is so much deleting fields because they still contain data
(since you probably don't want that data anyway), but deleting fields
that are used by scripts and relationships to/from other linked files.
You need to be VERY careful that you REALLY don't need the fields -
especially if the database was created a long time ago or by someone
else since a field may look useless, but is really a neccessity to the
functioning of the whole system.

Helpful Harry                  
"Just trying to help whenever I can."      :o)

 
 
 

Deleting fields

Post by Le Nomade.Co » Sun, 06 Jul 2003 10:40:06


Hello
Use FM dev and create a report about the database, that way you'll see
if the fields have any relationship with existing scripts.

Philippe.


> A long time ago (on this forum I believe), there was a discussion on
> deleting fields.  It was advised never to delete fields in an
> established database as it could mess up the database somehow.

> My goal is to overhaul our existing database which has many unused
> fields.  I was hoping that I could save the database as an empty
> clone, delete the unused fields, then import the data back into the
> cleaner database that I would avoid any problems with deleted fields.

> Does anyone have advice on this subject?

> Thanks,
> Jackie

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Deleting fields

Post by Jack » Mon, 07 Jul 2003 01:17:49


Yes, I have created a report using ClickStats Pro, and I feel
comfortable knowing that certain fields are not being used anywhere.

So, most people feel that the only concern with deleting fields is if
the fields are used anywhere (which is a no-brainer)?

Thanks


> Hello
> Use FM dev and create a report about the database, that way you'll see
> if the fields have any relationship with existing scripts.

> Philippe.

 
 
 

Deleting fields

Post by jemmy duck » Mon, 07 Jul 2003 09:53:06




> So, most people feel that the only concern with deleting fields is if
> the fields are used anywhere (which is a no-brainer)?

I was weeding out some fields myself the other day. The database design
report indicated a number of fields were used in no layouts, scripts,
or relations. However, I knew for a fact that one of these fields was
used in a script. Turns out I was right and the field was used--it was
the field referenced by a saved find, so the field was not referred to
by name. Be careful.