Dial-up Networking keeping track of connection rate, not just port rate

Dial-up Networking keeping track of connection rate, not just port rate

Post by Scott M. Lyo » Sat, 25 Mar 2000 04:00:00



I was able to set up my modem (an external 56k kflex/v90 Rockwell modem)
both in Windows 95, as well as the original Windows 98. If I recall, when I
first installed the original Windows 98, I had problems like this when I
used the drivers from the modem manufacturer, but when I chose instead the
standard modem driver from Windows 98, the connection rate would still show
(by the connection icon down by the clock).

Yesterday I decided to do a clean-install of Windows 98 Second Edition. And
the modem auto-detected as expected, and asked for the Rockwell driver,
which I supplied.

When I installed that driver, the connection icon by the clock didn't tell
me what rate it'd connected at (i.e. 48000bps, 49333bps, etc.), but rather
it just always came up with the maximum rate for the post (namely 115000).

Now, what do I need to do so that I can tell once again what speed it
actually connected at? It's handy to be able to check at a glance if it
connected near 48-50k, or if it was more like 20-30k in which case I'd be
best off disconnecting and trying again, perhaps later.

Any ideas/suggestions?

Thanks in advance!
-Scott

 
 
 

Dial-up Networking keeping track of connection rate, not just port rate

Post by Ron Badou » Sat, 25 Mar 2000 04:00:00


Generally the problem is the wrong driver is loaded; however, some modems
require an extra setting--check your modem documentation.

--
Regards

Ron Badour, MS MVP W95/98 Systems
Making good newsgroup posts:
http://members.xoom.com/rwbadour/assets/images/Gpost.zip
Tips:  http://members.xoom.com/rwbadour/
Knowledge Base Info:  http://support.microsoft.com/support/search/c.asp



> I was able to set up my modem (an external 56k kflex/v90 Rockwell modem)
> both in Windows 95, as well as the original Windows 98. If I recall, when
I
> first installed the original Windows 98, I had problems like this when I
> used the drivers from the modem manufacturer, but when I chose instead the
> standard modem driver from Windows 98, the connection rate would still
show
> (by the connection icon down by the clock).

> Yesterday I decided to do a clean-install of Windows 98 Second Edition.
And
> the modem auto-detected as expected, and asked for the Rockwell driver,
> which I supplied.

> When I installed that driver, the connection icon by the clock didn't tell
> me what rate it'd connected at (i.e. 48000bps, 49333bps, etc.), but rather
> it just always came up with the maximum rate for the post (namely 115000).

> Now, what do I need to do so that I can tell once again what speed it
> actually connected at? It's handy to be able to check at a glance if it
> connected near 48-50k, or if it was more like 20-30k in which case I'd be
> best off disconnecting and trying again, perhaps later.

> Any ideas/suggestions?

> Thanks in advance!
> -Scott



 
 
 

Dial-up Networking keeping track of connection rate, not just port rate

Post by Mark Phillip » Sat, 25 Mar 2000 04:00:00


Scott,

Add W2 to the Extra settings line for your modem. This tells the modem to
report the actual modem-to-modem connect rate.

Mark Phillips
MS-MVP


> Generally the problem is the wrong driver is loaded; however, some modems
> require an extra setting--check your modem documentation.

> --
> Regards

> Ron Badour, MS MVP W95/98 Systems
> Making good newsgroup posts:
> http://members.xoom.com/rwbadour/assets/images/Gpost.zip
> Tips:  http://members.xoom.com/rwbadour/
> Knowledge Base Info:  http://support.microsoft.com/support/search/c.asp



> > I was able to set up my modem (an external 56k kflex/v90 Rockwell modem)
> > both in Windows 95, as well as the original Windows 98. If I recall,
when
> I
> > first installed the original Windows 98, I had problems like this when I
> > used the drivers from the modem manufacturer, but when I chose instead
the
> > standard modem driver from Windows 98, the connection rate would still
> show
> > (by the connection icon down by the clock).

> > Yesterday I decided to do a clean-install of Windows 98 Second Edition.
> And
> > the modem auto-detected as expected, and asked for the Rockwell driver,
> > which I supplied.

> > When I installed that driver, the connection icon by the clock didn't
tell
> > me what rate it'd connected at (i.e. 48000bps, 49333bps, etc.), but
rather
> > it just always came up with the maximum rate for the post (namely
115000).

> > Now, what do I need to do so that I can tell once again what speed it
> > actually connected at? It's handy to be able to check at a glance if it
> > connected near 48-50k, or if it was more like 20-30k in which case I'd
be
> > best off disconnecting and trying again, perhaps later.

> > Any ideas/suggestions?

> > Thanks in advance!
> > -Scott


 
 
 

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