Overview of Readonly recordset

Overview of Readonly recordset

Post by Lars Gr?ttelan » Sat, 04 Oct 2003 10:08:07



I was wondering if there are any overview of when SQL EM sets the recordset
to read only.
Ex: SELECT DISTINCT  TblName FROM TABLE1.
If I run this in EM, I''m not able to edit the fields, but when I''m not
using the distinct - I can edit the fields. Are there any overview when a
recordset is read only.
I know of these now:

Disitnct
Union
Pass through
SUM
AVG

All these examples sets the EM fields to read only. Any overview of when a
recordset is read only would be appreciated.

The reason I want this information is that I was wondering if I should use a
larege recordset - 90 columns - or should I use several small ones. If I go
for the small ones - what's the benefit of that regarding the large one?

Give me a little hint here please.
--

- Lars

 
 
 

Overview of Readonly recordset

Post by Shinichi Yoned » Sun, 05 Oct 2003 00:49:47


Hi,

Quote:> I was wondering if there are any overview of when SQL EM sets the
recordset
> to read only.
> Ex: SELECT DISTINCT  TblName FROM TABLE1.

 DISTINCT mean
1 field in  EM = data from some record (1 or more)
(When EDIT, which record?)

 TRY
UPDATE TABLE1
    SET  TblName = 'toTblNameValue'
    WHERE TblName = 'orgTblNameValue'

-------

Microsoft Most Valuable Professional
MVP for SQL Server 2002-2003


Quote:> I was wondering if there are any overview of when SQL EM sets the
recordset
> to read only.
> Ex: SELECT DISTINCT  TblName FROM TABLE1.
> If I run this in EM, I''m not able to edit the fields, but when I''m not
> using the distinct - I can edit the fields. Are there any overview when a
> recordset is read only.
> I know of these now:

> Disitnct
> Union
> Pass through
> SUM
> AVG

> All these examples sets the EM fields to read only. Any overview of when a
> recordset is read only would be appreciated.

> The reason I want this information is that I was wondering if I should use
a
> larege recordset - 90 columns - or should I use several small ones. If I
go
> for the small ones - what's the benefit of that regarding the large one?

> Give me a little hint here please.
> --

> - Lars