Standard edition VS Enterprise edition SQL 7.0

Standard edition VS Enterprise edition SQL 7.0

Post by Geir Holm » Thu, 23 Sep 1999 04:00:00



Hi.
Is there any performance differences between these two editions. I heard
something about buffering max 15 queries or something on the standard
edition.
Anyone with directions to information about this?

thanx.

 
 
 

Standard edition VS Enterprise edition SQL 7.0

Post by Jerry Spive » Thu, 23 Sep 1999 04:00:00


Geir - The main differences are that EE supports up to 32 processors,
supports extended memory, provides failover clustering support and supports
user-defined cube partitions for scalability and performance in using OLAP
Services.

--
HTH
--
Jerry Spivey
MCT, MCSE, MCSD
Senior SQL Instructor - Consultant
ARIS Corporation  Bellevue, WA
(Please reply to the newsgroup only, not by email.)


Quote:> Hi.
> Is there any performance differences between these two editions. I heard
> something about buffering max 15 queries or something on the standard
> edition.
> Anyone with directions to information about this?

> thanx.


 
 
 

Standard edition VS Enterprise edition SQL 7.0

Post by Neil Pik » Sat, 25 Sep 1999 04:00:00


Geir - I don't believe there are any performance things like this

Quote:> Is there any performance differences between these two editions. I heard
> something about buffering max 15 queries or something on the standard
> edition.

Q.     What versions/types of SQL 7 are there and what are the differences?  
How can I tell which one I am running?
(v1.12  1999.06.18)

A. There are 6 versions/types of SQL 7, all built on the same code-base, so
they are all SQL 7, and the same servicepacks can be applied to all of them.

1.  Enterprise Edition.  Only runs on NT EE.  Supports > 4 processors.  
Supports 2 node symmetrical clustering.  Supports > 2Gb memory.  Supports
partitioned OLAP cubes - i.e. OLAP cubes running on multiple servers.

2.  Standard Edition.  Only runs on NT Server or higher.  Supports up to 4
processors.  Supports non-partitioned OLAP cubes.  (This is the version that
comes with BackOffice 4.5)

3.  Desktop Edition.  Can run on any NT or Windows 9x.  Some feature and
performance limitations - e.g. not all optimisations (like parallelism), only
single threaded recovery, not as much use of async io (Windows 9x doesn't
support at all), db's only opened when needed.  Performance has generally been
throttled back to make it unsuitable for a multiple client environment - if you
try and use more than 5-6 concurrent users you will find performance tapers
off.  N.B.  You can't buy the desktop edition on it's own.  You have to buy the
standard/enterprise edition - the installs for which allow a desktop install to
be done.  The desktop version just needs a CAL per copy as a license.

4.  Small Business Edition (Part of SBS 4.5).  Same as Standard Edition except
limited to 100 users and 10Gb per databases.  This version can be updated to
the Standard Edition if needed.

5.  MSDE.  This is a run-time engine, delivered as part of Office 2000, and can
act as a back end to Access 2000 instead of Jet - although Jet will still be
supported.  Has some admin tools, though not the full SQL EM MMC environment.  
e.g. does not include DTS design tools though you can run pre-developed DTS
packages against it.  Footprint in disk space is 35Mb, working set is 6-7mb at
startup, 2-5mb for processing.  Limited to 2Gb per database.  MSDE is freely
distributable as long as the application you package it with was developed
using a licensed copy of the MS Office 2000 Developer Edition.  Note MSDE is
packaged as v1.0 but it's still really SQL 7.0.  Performance is similarly
throttled back like with desktop edition.

6.  Developer Edition.  This is the connection-limited version that comes with
Visual Studio/MSDN specifically for use as a development tool - Visual Studio
contains all the client SQL debugging tools as well.  


MSDE on ..............
Desktop Edition on .................
Standard Edition on .................
Enterprise Edition on ................


 Neil Pike MVP/MCSE.  Protech Computing Ltd
 (Please reply only to newsgroups)
 For SQL FAQ entries see

 or www.ntfaq.com/sql.html (+ ntfaq download)
 or http://www.swynk.com/faq/sql/sqlserverfaq.asp
 or http://www.sql-server.co.uk

 
 
 

1. SQL 7.0 Standard Edition vs. Enterprise Edition

Does anyone have a link to any documentation that states that SQL Server 7.0
Standard Edition cannot access 3GB of physical memory on a Windows NT 4.0
Enterprise Edition Server (I'm almost sure it can only access 2GB).

I am 95% sure you need the Enterprise Edition of SQL 7.0 to access 3GB of
memory on a NT 4.0 Enterprise Server with the /3GB switch.  Any help would
be greatly appreciated.

Thank you,

Chris Long
Jacksonville, FL

2. Going to the Web

3. MS-SQL 2000 Enterprise edition vs. Standard Edition

4. More-than-synchronized filesfor disparate software???

5. Differences between SQL Server 7.0 Standard Edition and the Enterprise Edition

6. Connecting to Oracle7 using Sqlnet v2...

7. Standard Edition vs Enterprise Edition

8. WATCOM win386 read error

9. Enterprise Edition vs Standard Edition 7

10. Enterprise edition vs. Standard Edition

11. Enterprise Edition vs Standard Edition

12. Oracle 8i Standard Edition vs Enterprise Edition for Linux

13. Enterprise Edition vs Standard Edition