Why are 600DPI workgroup printers being discontinued?

Why are 600DPI workgroup printers being discontinued?

Post by Mark Ayzenshtey » Fri, 11 Feb 2000 04:00:00



Hi all,

I am trying to figure out why most manufacturers are dropping or
have already dropped their 600DPI workgroup laser models in favour
of 1200DPI models. By workgroup I mean 10-12ppm 15K-20Kppm. I don't see
why most workgroup situations(small offices and home offices) need 1200DPI.
I think 600DPI is more then enough. But both HP & Xerox don't seem to agree
with me. HP hasn't had a 600DPI workgroup printer for a while and
Xerox just discontinued the P12 to be replaced with the P1202 which is
1200DPI printer and is about $180 more then the P12. What am I missing here?
Why do the big companies think small offices need 1200DPI?

Mark

--
==========================================================================
                       Mark  Ayzenshteyn      

                  http://www.bonzo.org/~marka            

 
 
 

Why are 600DPI workgroup printers being discontinued?

Post by will » Sat, 12 Feb 2000 04:00:00



> Hi all,

> I am trying to figure out why most manufacturers are dropping or
> Xerox just discontinued the P12 to be replaced with the P1202 which is
> 1200DPI printer and is about $180 more then the P12. What am I missing
here?
> Why do the big companies think small offices need 1200DPI?

\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\

IMHO, you gotta understand the less they have to support the better the
logistics, etc. They're not making so many different models just on DPI
alone. Also there's a good possibly that the basic printer they offer will
only be 1200, but can access 600dpi provide that's optionable via s/w or
configure by the front panel. Progress marches on, and the "new" level of a
basic printer is at a higher level and of course the cost is greater but
you susposely get more. Sooner or later you get on the bandwagon and just
"grin and bear it".

good luck -----Willy

--
Posted via CNET Help.com
http://www.help.com/

 
 
 

Why are 600DPI workgroup printers being discontinued?

Post by Material Gu » Sat, 12 Feb 2000 04:00:00


It is fair to say that some people would be able to get along in life
just fine with an automobile just like the ones produced in the 1970's.

They need no more than that.

However, that specific customer market does not justify the continuing
production of 1970's type automobiles.

Time marches on, and business is finding ways to make profits.  Not
fractionate themselves satisfying each and every possible market niche.

While still useful to millions, the 1970's atuomobile is no longer
produced.

While still useful to millions, the 300 DPI network printer is dead as a
new product, and the 600 DPI is "out of fashion, lower in demand, except
for some folks with 1970's autos".

Mark can't grasp this analogy.

Jim Buch



> > Hi all,

> > I am trying to figure out why most manufacturers are dropping or
> > Xerox just discontinued the P12 to be replaced with the P1202 which is
> > 1200DPI printer and is about $180 more then the P12. What am I missing
> here?
> > Why do the big companies think small offices need 1200DPI?
> \\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\

> IMHO, you gotta understand the less they have to support the better the
> logistics, etc. They're not making so many different models just on DPI
> alone. Also there's a good possibly that the basic printer they offer will
> only be 1200, but can access 600dpi provide that's optionable via s/w or
> configure by the front panel. Progress marches on, and the "new" level of a
> basic printer is at a higher level and of course the cost is greater but
> you susposely get more. Sooner or later you get on the bandwagon and just
> "grin and bear it".

> good luck -----Willy

> --
> Posted via CNET Help.com
> http://www.help.com/

 
 
 

Why are 600DPI workgroup printers being discontinued?

Post by Mark Ayzenshtey » Sun, 13 Feb 2000 04:00:00


Disclaimer: Material Guy has written me some personal e-mail on this
subject and has now decided to reply publicly so I might make references
to his previous private responses in my public response.

: It is fair to say that some people would be able to get along in life
: just fine with an automobile just like the ones produced in the 1970's.
: They need no more than that.
: However, that specific customer market does not justify the continuing
: production of 1970's type automobiles.

This is really an incorrect analogy IMHO. I don't think I have ever seen
a car company change the base features of a model in one year and raise
the price by 30%. I think thats called pricing yourself out of a market.

A better analogy would be: I a customer(by the way I am one so don't tell
me just because I understand some technology I can no longer be one. The
last time I checked all it takes is money) wish to buy a 4 door
automobile. I cannot do with a 2 door automobile for whatever reasons.
It would be nice if this vehicle had an automatic transmission, air
conditioning etc, but all I REALLY NEED is 4 doors. I have a very limited
budget(remind you of small/home offices maybe) and this year there is a
base model of a 4 door automobile with a standard transimission and no AC
for $4.000. But next year when I actually need(have saved up for) the
automobile I find that the base model has been droped and my only choice
for a 4 door automobile is one with an automatic transmission and AC for
$6.000. Your logic tells me that people like me who have a hard time when
the price is raised by 30% are rare and I should just get with the program
and pay for features I don't need. What I am suggesting is maybe there is
a need for baseline models. Accounting for inflation prices of cars don't
increase much year to year. What is happening here is that the base model
is being discontinued and you are forced to pay a premium for features you
don't need. Perhaps I am wrong and those who have a hard time paying the
extra 30% are in such a minority their needs will not be attended. I don't
really know. I have fairly limited experience with the matter. This is why
I posted to a public forum where such things are discussed in a civilized
manner. For g-d's sake relax. Don't take it so seriously, its just usenet
discussions, its not real. From the tone you take in your messages one
would think you are defending the invention of electricity. Its getting so
a person can't make an inquiry to a public forum without being flamed.
For a decent response that does not insult the inteligence of the reader
consider what the person who responded to my message before you wrote.

: Time marches on, and business is finding ways to make profits.  Not
: fractionate themselves satisfying each and every possible market niche.

Yes capitalism does work this way. They have to sell you new products even
if you don't need them or else they would go out of business. My
suggestion was that large need remains for 600 DPI printers. It is
something I have noticed in my limited experience. People I have worked
with are not happy about paying 30-40% more for features they don't need,
but they bear it. Perhaps I am wrong and the number of people who use
their office printers mostly to print forms is small and most people tend
to print complicated reports on their small-office printers.

: While still useful to millions, the 1970's atuomobile is no longer
: produced.

: While still useful to millions, the 300 DPI network printer is dead as a
: new product, and the 600 DPI is "out of fashion, lower in demand, except
: for some folks with 1970's autos".

: Mark can't grasp this analogy.

With all due respect I was asking for opinions of others. And IMHO your
analogy is wrong.

Mark

: Jim Buch

:>
:> >
:> >
:> > Hi all,
:> >
:> > I am trying to figure out why most manufacturers are dropping or
:> > Xerox just discontinued the P12 to be replaced with the P1202 which is
:> > 1200DPI printer and is about $180 more then the P12. What am I missing
:> here?
:> > Why do the big companies think small offices need 1200DPI?
:> \\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\
:>
:> IMHO, you gotta understand the less they have to support the better the
:> logistics, etc. They're not making so many different models just on DPI
:> alone. Also there's a good possibly that the basic printer they offer will
:> only be 1200, but can access 600dpi provide that's optionable via s/w or
:> configure by the front panel. Progress marches on, and the "new" level of a
:> basic printer is at a higher level and of course the cost is greater but
:> you susposely get more. Sooner or later you get on the bandwagon and just
:> "grin and bear it".
:>
:> good luck -----Willy
:>
:> --
:> Posted via CNET Help.com
:> http://www.help.com/

--
==========================================================================
                       Mark  Ayzenshteyn      

                  http://www.bonzo.org/~marka            

 
 
 

Why are 600DPI workgroup printers being discontinued?

Post by Material Gu » Sun, 13 Feb 2000 04:00:00


Keep talking Mark.

This is great for your reputation.

Jim


> Disclaimer: Material Guy has written me some personal e-mail on this
> subject and has now decided to reply publicly so I might make references
> to his previous private responses in my public response.


> : It is fair to say that some people would be able to get along in life
> : just fine with an automobile just like the ones produced in the 1970's.
> : They need no more than that.
> : However, that specific customer market does not justify the continuing
> : production of 1970's type automobiles.

> This is really an incorrect analogy IMHO. I don't think I have ever seen
> a car company change the base features of a model in one year and raise
> the price by 30%. I think thats called pricing yourself out of a market.

> A better analogy would be: I a customer(by the way I am one so don't tell
> me just because I understand some technology I can no longer be one. The
> last time I checked all it takes is money) wish to buy a 4 door
> automobile. I cannot do with a 2 door automobile for whatever reasons.
> It would be nice if this vehicle had an automatic transmission, air
> conditioning etc, but all I REALLY NEED is 4 doors. I have a very limited
> budget(remind you of small/home offices maybe) and this year there is a
> base model of a 4 door automobile with a standard transimission and no AC
> for $4.000. But next year when I actually need(have saved up for) the
> automobile I find that the base model has been droped and my only choice
> for a 4 door automobile is one with an automatic transmission and AC for
> $6.000. Your logic tells me that people like me who have a hard time when
> the price is raised by 30% are rare and I should just get with the program
> and pay for features I don't need. What I am suggesting is maybe there is
> a need for baseline models. Accounting for inflation prices of cars don't
> increase much year to year. What is happening here is that the base model
> is being discontinued and you are forced to pay a premium for features you
> don't need. Perhaps I am wrong and those who have a hard time paying the
> extra 30% are in such a minority their needs will not be attended. I don't
> really know. I have fairly limited experience with the matter. This is why
> I posted to a public forum where such things are discussed in a civilized
> manner. For g-d's sake relax. Don't take it so seriously, its just usenet
> discussions, its not real. From the tone you take in your messages one
> would think you are defending the invention of electricity. Its getting so
> a person can't make an inquiry to a public forum without being flamed.
> For a decent response that does not insult the inteligence of the reader
> consider what the person who responded to my message before you wrote.

> : Time marches on, and business is finding ways to make profits.  Not
> : fractionate themselves satisfying each and every possible market niche.

> Yes capitalism does work this way. They have to sell you new products even
> if you don't need them or else they would go out of business. My
> suggestion was that large need remains for 600 DPI printers. It is
> something I have noticed in my limited experience. People I have worked
> with are not happy about paying 30-40% more for features they don't need,
> but they bear it. Perhaps I am wrong and the number of people who use
> their office printers mostly to print forms is small and most people tend
> to print complicated reports on their small-office printers.

> : While still useful to millions, the 1970's atuomobile is no longer
> : produced.

> : While still useful to millions, the 300 DPI network printer is dead as a
> : new product, and the 600 DPI is "out of fashion, lower in demand, except
> : for some folks with 1970's autos".

> : Mark can't grasp this analogy.

> With all due respect I was asking for opinions of others. And IMHO your
> analogy is wrong.

> Mark

> : Jim Buch


> :>

> :> >
> :> >
> :> > Hi all,
> :> >
> :> > I am trying to figure out why most manufacturers are dropping or
> :> > Xerox just discontinued the P12 to be replaced with the P1202 which is
> :> > 1200DPI printer and is about $180 more then the P12. What am I missing
> :> here?
> :> > Why do the big companies think small offices need 1200DPI?
> :> \\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\
> :>
> :> IMHO, you gotta understand the less they have to support the better the
> :> logistics, etc. They're not making so many different models just on DPI
> :> alone. Also there's a good possibly that the basic printer they offer will
> :> only be 1200, but can access 600dpi provide that's optionable via s/w or
> :> configure by the front panel. Progress marches on, and the "new" level of a
> :> basic printer is at a higher level and of course the cost is greater but
> :> you susposely get more. Sooner or later you get on the bandwagon and just
> :> "grin and bear it".
> :>
> :> good luck -----Willy
> :>
> :> --
> :> Posted via CNET Help.com
> :> http://www.help.com/

> --
> ==========================================================================
>                        Mark  Ayzenshteyn

>                   http://www.bonzo.org/~marka

 
 
 

Why are 600DPI workgroup printers being discontinued?

Post by Bob » Sun, 13 Feb 2000 04:00:00



> Hi all,

> I am trying to figure out why most manufacturers are dropping or
> have already dropped their 600DPI workgroup laser models in favour
> of 1200DPI models. By workgroup I mean 10-12ppm 15K-20Kppm. I don't see
> why most workgroup situations(small offices and home offices) need 1200DPI.
> I think 600DPI is more then enough. But both HP & Xerox don't seem to agree
> with me. HP hasn't had a 600DPI workgroup printer for a while and
> Xerox just discontinued the P12 to be replaced with the P1202 which is
> 1200DPI printer and is about $180 more then the P12. What am I missing here?
> Why do the big companies think small offices need 1200DPI?

> Mark

I just saw the Xerox P1202 in a catalog at a price of $600 US. Was the
P12 model really $180 below that price?

It is possible the cost difference to the printer manufacturers for a
difference between 600 dpi and 1200 dpi is very little. There may have
been a big cost difference at one time when 1200 dpi laser printers were
just coming out and there weren't as many sold, but I doubt it is big
cost difference now. The printers that handle 1200 dpi nowsadays are a
lot less expensive than the printers that only handled 300 dpi only 5 -
10 years ago.

Printer manufacturers are in the business to make money. They sell what
their Customers want, for a price the market will bear.

It's possible that some of the price difference might have to do with
the standard ability to connect to pc/network in more ways, maybe higher
amount of memory included as a standard, or something else that has
nothing to do with print resolution. I think on the older printers at
work, the first thing that was done was to add more printer memory to
the standard memory included (even at 300 dpi).

 
 
 

Why are 600DPI workgroup printers being discontinued?

Post by Bob » Sun, 13 Feb 2000 04:00:00




> > Hi all,

> > I am trying to figure out why most manufacturers are dropping or
> > have already dropped their 600DPI workgroup laser models in favour
> > of 1200DPI models. By workgroup I mean 10-12ppm 15K-20Kppm. I don't see
> > why most workgroup situations(small offices and home offices) need 1200DPI.
> > I think 600DPI is more then enough. But both HP & Xerox don't seem to agree
> > with me. HP hasn't had a 600DPI workgroup printer for a while and
> > Xerox just discontinued the P12 to be replaced with the P1202 which is
> > 1200DPI printer and is about $180 more then the P12. What am I missing here?
> > Why do the big companies think small offices need 1200DPI?

> > Mark

> I just saw the Xerox P1202 in a catalog at a price of $600 US. Was the
> P12 model really $180 below that price?

I guess I'll answer my own question. I checked out Xerox site, and I
guess the P12 could be $180 below cost of P1202 depending on where and
when purchased.

I also noticed that the P1202 has some other differences besides just
the higher resolution. The P1202 has a standard interface for USB, in
addition to the parallel interface. USB support is going to have to be a
consideration in the future. The P1202 has a standard memory of 4 MB
instead of the 2 MB included for the P12. For a small office, 4 MB is
better for a small office, even when a resolution setting of 600 dpi is
used. Also, the tray capacity (input and output) of the P1202 is larger
for the P12.

 
 
 

Why are 600DPI workgroup printers being discontinued?

Post by Material Gu » Sun, 13 Feb 2000 04:00:00


Hi Bob:

Yes, going to the Xerox web site will help understand.

For example, here is a part of their FAQ which appears to deny any
relationship between the P12 and the P1202:

Quote:

>             Frequently Asked Questions

>             P1202, P12 Relationship

>             Is the DocuPrint P1202 related to the DocuPrint P12?

>             Although, the printers share a similar name, they are not related in any way. Therefore, the Driver for the
>             DocuPrint P1202 will NOT work on the DocuPrint P12, and the Driver for the DocuPrint P12 will NOT
>             work on the DocuPrint P1202.

>             Click for Additional FAQs

The suggested retail price for the P12, on the Xerox site, is now $399.
When the printer was introduced about 5 years ago, the suggested retail
price was $700.  Yes, that is the common everyday nothing special price
drop for a hardware product over several years in the computer business.

The suggested retail price for the new (unrelated) P1202 is $699.

If Xerox claims are true - no relationship except similar number -
between the P12 and P1202, then the impression that the price difference
is just the 1200dpi stuff isn't conclusive.

Then the alleged comparison of prices comes into question of "is it
apples vs apples or apples vs oranges?"

Not only have we seen large drops in prices of laser printers over the
years, but the performance climbs.  12 vs 1202 for the same product
release price.

Of course, the same thing has happened with scanners.  More DPI (up from
200 to 300 then 600 and now 1200 DPI) and the prices are falling.

CPU's are in the same family as well.  Faster CPU's every year, and the
Introductory Intel CPU price used to be $1,000 (about 1992 4986-50 MHZ)
and it has dropped to about $800 for today's newest released CPU's that
are more than 10X faster than the old ones.

We're beating a dead horse to death here.

MORE, BETTER, FASTER and CHEAPER is the rule of the business in the long
run.  That is all that we are seeing.

Oh, yeah, some folks appear not able to relate technical, speed and
economic progress in scanners with printers with CPU's with memory with
.........  But I won't mention any names.

Jim Buch




> > > Hi all,

> > > I am trying to figure out why most manufacturers are dropping or
> > > have already dropped their 600DPI workgroup laser models in favour
> > > of 1200DPI models. By workgroup I mean 10-12ppm 15K-20Kppm. I don't see
> > > why most workgroup situations(small offices and home offices) need 1200DPI.
> > > I think 600DPI is more then enough. But both HP & Xerox don't seem to agree
> > > with me. HP hasn't had a 600DPI workgroup printer for a while and
> > > Xerox just discontinued the P12 to be replaced with the P1202 which is
> > > 1200DPI printer and is about $180 more then the P12. What am I missing here?
> > > Why do the big companies think small offices need 1200DPI?

> > > Mark

> > I just saw the Xerox P1202 in a catalog at a price of $600 US. Was the
> > P12 model really $180 below that price?

> I guess I'll answer my own question. I checked out Xerox site, and I
> guess the P12 could be $180 below cost of P1202 depending on where and
> when purchased.

> I also noticed that the P1202 has some other differences besides just
> the higher resolution. The P1202 has a standard interface for USB, in
> addition to the parallel interface. USB support is going to have to be a
> consideration in the future. The P1202 has a standard memory of 4 MB
> instead of the 2 MB included for the P12. For a small office, 4 MB is
> better for a small office, even when a resolution setting of 600 dpi is
> used. Also, the tray capacity (input and output) of the P1202 is larger
> for the P12.

 
 
 

Why are 600DPI workgroup printers being discontinued?

Post by Mark Ayzenshtey » Sun, 13 Feb 2000 04:00:00


I guess you are right. In time the 1202 will side down in price anyway so
it won't matter anyway. Its just when I did research on the printer I
needed to get I decided on the P12 which cost about $400 and when I went
to buy it I found it is discontiuned and the only thing avalable is the
P1202 for 30% more. Oh well. I guess I should have bought sooner.

Mark

:>
:> >
:> > Hi all,
:> >
:> > I am trying to figure out why most manufacturers are dropping or
:> > have already dropped their 600DPI workgroup laser models in favour
:> > of 1200DPI models. By workgroup I mean 10-12ppm 15K-20Kppm. I don't see
:> > why most workgroup situations(small offices and home offices) need 1200DPI.
:> > I think 600DPI is more then enough. But both HP & Xerox don't seem to agree
:> > with me. HP hasn't had a 600DPI workgroup printer for a while and
:> > Xerox just discontinued the P12 to be replaced with the P1202 which is
:> > 1200DPI printer and is about $180 more then the P12. What am I missing here?
:> > Why do the big companies think small offices need 1200DPI?
:> >
:> > Mark
:>
:> I just saw the Xerox P1202 in a catalog at a price of $600 US. Was the
:> P12 model really $180 below that price?

: I guess I'll answer my own question. I checked out Xerox site, and I
: guess the P12 could be $180 below cost of P1202 depending on where and
: when purchased.

: I also noticed that the P1202 has some other differences besides just
: the higher resolution. The P1202 has a standard interface for USB, in
: addition to the parallel interface. USB support is going to have to be a
: consideration in the future. The P1202 has a standard memory of 4 MB
: instead of the 2 MB included for the P12. For a small office, 4 MB is
: better for a small office, even when a resolution setting of 600 dpi is
: used. Also, the tray capacity (input and output) of the P1202 is larger
: for the P12.

--
==========================================================================
                       Mark  Ayzenshteyn      

                  http://www.bonzo.org/~marka            

 
 
 

Why are 600DPI workgroup printers being discontinued?

Post by Mark Ayzenshtey » Sun, 13 Feb 2000 04:00:00


Um This is the usenet. If you have a great reputation on
comp.perphs.printes good for you. I on the other hand don't really want
one. I quite happy having one in the real world.

Good Day,

Mark

: Keep talking Mark.

: This is great for your reputation.

: Jim

:>
:> Disclaimer: Material Guy has written me some personal e-mail on this
:> subject and has now decided to reply publicly so I might make references
:> to his previous private responses in my public response.
:>

:> : It is fair to say that some people would be able to get along in life
:> : just fine with an automobile just like the ones produced in the 1970's.
:> : They need no more than that.
:> : However, that specific customer market does not justify the continuing
:> : production of 1970's type automobiles.
:>
:> This is really an incorrect analogy IMHO. I don't think I have ever seen
:> a car company change the base features of a model in one year and raise
:> the price by 30%. I think thats called pricing yourself out of a market.
:>
:> A better analogy would be: I a customer(by the way I am one so don't tell
:> me just because I understand some technology I can no longer be one. The
:> last time I checked all it takes is money) wish to buy a 4 door
:> automobile. I cannot do with a 2 door automobile for whatever reasons.
:> It would be nice if this vehicle had an automatic transmission, air
:> conditioning etc, but all I REALLY NEED is 4 doors. I have a very limited
:> budget(remind you of small/home offices maybe) and this year there is a
:> base model of a 4 door automobile with a standard transimission and no AC
:> for $4.000. But next year when I actually need(have saved up for) the
:> automobile I find that the base model has been droped and my only choice
:> for a 4 door automobile is one with an automatic transmission and AC for
:> $6.000. Your logic tells me that people like me who have a hard time when
:> the price is raised by 30% are rare and I should just get with the program
:> and pay for features I don't need. What I am suggesting is maybe there is
:> a need for baseline models. Accounting for inflation prices of cars don't
:> increase much year to year. What is happening here is that the base model
:> is being discontinued and you are forced to pay a premium for features you
:> don't need. Perhaps I am wrong and those who have a hard time paying the
:> extra 30% are in such a minority their needs will not be attended. I don't
:> really know. I have fairly limited experience with the matter. This is why
:> I posted to a public forum where such things are discussed in a civilized
:> manner. For g-d's sake relax. Don't take it so seriously, its just usenet
:> discussions, its not real. From the tone you take in your messages one
:> would think you are defending the invention of electricity. Its getting so
:> a person can't make an inquiry to a public forum without being flamed.
:> For a decent response that does not insult the inteligence of the reader
:> consider what the person who responded to my message before you wrote.
:>
:> : Time marches on, and business is finding ways to make profits.  Not
:> : fractionate themselves satisfying each and every possible market niche.
:>
:> Yes capitalism does work this way. They have to sell you new products even
:> if you don't need them or else they would go out of business. My
:> suggestion was that large need remains for 600 DPI printers. It is
:> something I have noticed in my limited experience. People I have worked
:> with are not happy about paying 30-40% more for features they don't need,
:> but they bear it. Perhaps I am wrong and the number of people who use
:> their office printers mostly to print forms is small and most people tend
:> to print complicated reports on their small-office printers.
:>
:> : While still useful to millions, the 1970's atuomobile is no longer
:> : produced.
:>
:> : While still useful to millions, the 300 DPI network printer is dead as a
:> : new product, and the 600 DPI is "out of fashion, lower in demand, except
:> : for some folks with 1970's autos".
:>
:> : Mark can't grasp this analogy.
:>
:> With all due respect I was asking for opinions of others. And IMHO your
:> analogy is wrong.
:>
:> Mark
:>
:> : Jim Buch
:>
:> :>

:> :> >
:> :> >
:> :> > Hi all,
:> :> >
:> :> > I am trying to figure out why most manufacturers are dropping or
:> :> > Xerox just discontinued the P12 to be replaced with the P1202 which is
:> :> > 1200DPI printer and is about $180 more then the P12. What am I missing
:> :> here?
:> :> > Why do the big companies think small offices need 1200DPI?
:> :> \\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\
:> :>
:> :> IMHO, you gotta understand the less they have to support the better the
:> :> logistics, etc. They're not making so many different models just on DPI
:> :> alone. Also there's a good possibly that the basic printer they offer will
:> :> only be 1200, but can access 600dpi provide that's optionable via s/w or
:> :> configure by the front panel. Progress marches on, and the "new" level of a
:> :> basic printer is at a higher level and of course the cost is greater but
:> :> you susposely get more. Sooner or later you get on the bandwagon and just
:> :> "grin and bear it".
:> :>
:> :> good luck -----Willy
:> :>
:> :> --
:> :> Posted via CNET Help.com
:> :> http://www.help.com/
:>
:> --
:> ==========================================================================
:>                        Mark  Ayzenshteyn

:>                   http://www.bonzo.org/~marka
:>

--
==========================================================================
                       Mark  Ayzenshteyn      

                  http://www.bonzo.org/~marka            

 
 
 

Why are 600DPI workgroup printers being discontinued?

Post by Material Gu » Mon, 14 Feb 2000 04:00:00


I found several places on the web still selling the P12.  

Know how to comparison shop on the web?

Jim


> I guess you are right. In time the 1202 will side down in price anyway so
> it won't matter anyway. Its just when I did research on the printer I
> needed to get I decided on the P12 which cost about $400 and when I went
> to buy it I found it is discontiuned and the only thing avalable is the
> P1202 for 30% more. Oh well. I guess I should have bought sooner.

> Mark



> :>

> :> >
> :> > Hi all,
> :> >
> :> > I am trying to figure out why most manufacturers are dropping or
> :> > have already dropped their 600DPI workgroup laser models in favour
> :> > of 1200DPI models. By workgroup I mean 10-12ppm 15K-20Kppm. I don't see
> :> > why most workgroup situations(small offices and home offices) need 1200DPI.
> :> > I think 600DPI is more then enough. But both HP & Xerox don't seem to agree
> :> > with me. HP hasn't had a 600DPI workgroup printer for a while and
> :> > Xerox just discontinued the P12 to be replaced with the P1202 which is
> :> > 1200DPI printer and is about $180 more then the P12. What am I missing here?
> :> > Why do the big companies think small offices need 1200DPI?
> :> >
> :> > Mark
> :>
> :> I just saw the Xerox P1202 in a catalog at a price of $600 US. Was the
> :> P12 model really $180 below that price?

> : I guess I'll answer my own question. I checked out Xerox site, and I
> : guess the P12 could be $180 below cost of P1202 depending on where and
> : when purchased.

> : I also noticed that the P1202 has some other differences besides just
> : the higher resolution. The P1202 has a standard interface for USB, in
> : addition to the parallel interface. USB support is going to have to be a
> : consideration in the future. The P1202 has a standard memory of 4 MB
> : instead of the 2 MB included for the P12. For a small office, 4 MB is
> : better for a small office, even when a resolution setting of 600 dpi is
> : used. Also, the tray capacity (input and output) of the P1202 is larger
> : for the P12.

> --
> ==========================================================================
>                        Mark  Ayzenshteyn

>                   http://www.bonzo.org/~marka

 
 
 

Why are 600DPI workgroup printers being discontinued?

Post by Mark Ayzenshtey » Mon, 14 Feb 2000 04:00:00


Yea I ordered one last week. Only once place actually has it. The rest
said they had it on the web, but it turns out they didn't when I called
them. I now need another one for a different client, but I can't do mail
order for them, they need one tommorow and its not avalable localy so
thats why I have to buy them a more expensive one.

Mark


: I found several places on the web still selling the P12.  

: Know how to comparison shop on the web?

: Jim

:>
:> I guess you are right. In time the 1202 will side down in price anyway so
:> it won't matter anyway. Its just when I did research on the printer I
:> needed to get I decided on the P12 which cost about $400 and when I went
:> to buy it I found it is discontiuned and the only thing avalable is the
:> P1202 for 30% more. Oh well. I guess I should have bought sooner.
:>
:> Mark
:>
:> :>

:> :> >
:> :> > Hi all,
:> :> >
:> :> > I am trying to figure out why most manufacturers are dropping or
:> :> > have already dropped their 600DPI workgroup laser models in favour
:> :> > of 1200DPI models. By workgroup I mean 10-12ppm 15K-20Kppm. I don't see
:> :> > why most workgroup situations(small offices and home offices) need 1200DPI.
:> :> > I think 600DPI is more then enough. But both HP & Xerox don't seem to agree
:> :> > with me. HP hasn't had a 600DPI workgroup printer for a while and
:> :> > Xerox just discontinued the P12 to be replaced with the P1202 which is
:> :> > 1200DPI printer and is about $180 more then the P12. What am I missing here?
:> :> > Why do the big companies think small offices need 1200DPI?
:> :> >
:> :> > Mark
:> :>
:> :> I just saw the Xerox P1202 in a catalog at a price of $600 US. Was the
:> :> P12 model really $180 below that price?
:>
:> : I guess I'll answer my own question. I checked out Xerox site, and I
:> : guess the P12 could be $180 below cost of P1202 depending on where and
:> : when purchased.
:>
:> : I also noticed that the P1202 has some other differences besides just
:> : the higher resolution. The P1202 has a standard interface for USB, in
:> : addition to the parallel interface. USB support is going to have to be a
:> : consideration in the future. The P1202 has a standard memory of 4 MB
:> : instead of the 2 MB included for the P12. For a small office, 4 MB is
:> : better for a small office, even when a resolution setting of 600 dpi is
:> : used. Also, the tray capacity (input and output) of the P1202 is larger
:> : for the P12.
:>
:> --
:> ==========================================================================
:>                        Mark  Ayzenshteyn

:>                   http://www.bonzo.org/~marka
:>

--
==========================================================================
                       Mark  Ayzenshteyn      

                  http://www.bonzo.org/~marka            

 
 
 

1. Am I insane if I have XP and buy a HP psc 950 printer?

Hi everyone!

I know a decent amount about a fair number of things, but I confess
that my brain is full and I may be unable to make intelligent
computer-related purchases from now on.  Therefore, I turn to the
wisdom of this community.

I was going to buy the psc 950 multi-function printer some time ago,
when I learned of the driver problem for XP.  I see now (I think) that
HP asserts a driver is available.  Truth or lies?

My faith in HP has suffered over the course of this debacle, and
perhaps it would be wise to avoid their products all together.  Or is
it the case that the psc 950 actually works as promised?  What are
reasonable alternatives to the multi-function psc 950 that are likely
to work flawlessly in an XP environment? [I don't have a digital
camera yet, but I intend to get one, and that is one reason I was keen
on the psc 950]

Thanks for any recommendations, particularly from anyone who has tried
the new XP drivers.

Chuck

2. Do I really need XML?

3. am need some help for network printer

4. Exchange 5.5 (SBS 4.5) Migration to Exchange 2003 Standard

5. I am looking for owners of a brother m1309 printer,

6. Modem on dual processor systems???

7. I am cheated by HP printers!

8. repeat: copy protection of jpegs

9. I am looking for a reliable refill kit for my EPSON color printer

10. help: am looking for a driver for "IBM graphics printer"

11. Well I am pleased with Epson printers.

12. I am after a printer which has an RS424 interface

13. Am I unluckey getting an HP LJ 5L in for servicing, it's doing nothing.