How to use Tiger census Data

How to use Tiger census Data

Post by rajesh_man.. » Mon, 01 Jan 2001 12:13:38



I downloaded the Tiger census data. I tried to open it with arcview. It
is giving the following warning:

The project TGR48355.RT1 could not be opened.

Can anyone please help me.

Do we need to import, as we do with .e00 files.

Regards
Mandya

Sent via Deja.com
http://www.deja.com/

 
 
 

How to use Tiger census Data

Post by Andy Bechhoefe » Tue, 02 Jan 2001 08:03:36


Yes, you do need to import.  A Tiger file is an ASCII database file of line
segments.  An import program will put these segments together into usable
polygons (blocks, tracts, etc).  There is a redistricting software add-on
for Arcview called Autobound that includes a Tiger import program from a
place called Digital Engineering Corp.  I do not know if they will sell the
Tiger import program separately.  Hope that helps.

Andy


Quote:> I downloaded the Tiger census data. I tried to open it with arcview. It
> is giving the following warning:

> The project TGR48355.RT1 could not be opened.

> Can anyone please help me.

> Do we need to import, as we do with .e00 files.

> Regards
> Mandya

> Sent via Deja.com
> http://www.deja.com/


 
 
 

How to use Tiger census Data

Post by Gre » Tue, 09 Jan 2001 23:46:44


There is a tiger reader extension that you can download that will make
these useable in arcview.


Quote:>I downloaded the Tiger census data. I tried to open it with arcview. It
>is giving the following warning:

>The project TGR48355.RT1 could not be opened.

>Can anyone please help me.

>Do we need to import, as we do with .e00 files.

>Regards
>Mandya

>Sent via Deja.com
>http://www.deja.com/

--
 
 
 

1. TIGER files and composites (and U.S. census tract obsolescence)

I need help removing composites when I import TIGER files.  This
message is also relevant to those using the 2000 SF1 (summary file 1)
or later tract-level data.

Practical problem:  The SF1 file tract numbers do not correspond
exactly to the SAS/GIS census tract files.  I suspect this may be
migration of tracts, dividing up, etc., since 1990.  (It's also some
clear obsolescence.  In Florida, for example, Dade is now Miami-Dade
County, so the FIPS county code has shifted from 25 to 86 for the
Census Bureau -- not so for the SAS/GIS tract files in 8.2.  To be
honest, I'm quite surprised about that, but c'est la vie.)

The solution is to use the most recent TIGER files from the census
bureau (which are the redistricting TIGER files as of last week).
Since I'm working with an entire state, that's about 600 MB worth of
TIGER files even just for the two types (1 and 2) that SAS uses.  A
colleague has 8 GB free on his hard drive, but that's going to be a
NASTY file.

Obviously, I'd like to remove some composites for those layers I don't
intend to use.  Counties, tracts, and block groups are essential (or
at least counties and tracts are), and I need the address data for
geocoding.  But I don't need the waterways, places, or landmarks
stuff, and it might be very practical to make a BIG map set for
geocoding and a much slimmer one for the areas.  Is there any way to
selectively weed to get that done properly?  I've tried removing
composites on a county-level TIGER file, but there are always still
the default layers (including water and streets) in the imported map.

Sherman Dorn
University of South Florida
Associate Director, Consortium for Educational Research in Florida

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