hello newbie calling

hello newbie calling

Post by Alan Gau » Mon, 23 Jun 2003 07:08:18



HI folks,

I'm new to this newsgroup. I joined because I've finally
succumbed to temptation and started programming Cocoa on my 1
year old iBook. My background is in Unix (the reason I went for
MacOS instead of a Windoze laptop) with C/C++ and more
recently Python(yum!) and Java(yuk!).

Having read the posts over the last few days there are definitely
a few Cocoa developers here but I wondered what else Objective C
was being used for?

Is there any non MacOs/Nextstep/Openstep work being done using
Objective C?

Just curious,

Alan G.

 
 
 

hello newbie calling

Post by Michael As » Mon, 23 Jun 2003 10:58:14




Quote:> HI folks,

> I'm new to this newsgroup. I joined because I've finally
> succumbed to temptation and started programming Cocoa on my 1
> year old iBook. My background is in Unix (the reason I went for
> MacOS instead of a Windoze laptop) with C/C++ and more
> recently Python(yum!) and Java(yuk!).

> Having read the posts over the last few days there are definitely
> a few Cocoa developers here but I wondered what else Objective C
> was being used for?

> Is there any non MacOs/Nextstep/Openstep work being done using
> Objective C?

There is GNUStep, which provides a Cocoa-like environment under Linux,
Windows, and other such OSes. It's not quite all there yet, but it
sounds like it's already very useful even though it's not done.
http://www.gnustep.org

Swarm is a framework intended for scientific simulations. It has its own
object library written in Objective-C, with APIs available from both
ObjC and Java. http://www.swarm.org

I recall there being ObjC bindings for at least one unix GUI toolkit,
although I forget which one.

And of course there are many options if you just want to do your backend
in ObjC, and interface to the GUI with some more traditional API.
GNUStep provides a Foundation component (like Cocoa's Foundation), and
there's something called libFoundation out there as well. David Stes's
POC comes with ObjectPak, which I don't know much about. Or of course,
you could do all the heavy lifting yourself, and write your own object
library to work with. I don't know if this is a very popular option,
though.

 
 
 

hello newbie calling

Post by David Ste » Mon, 23 Jun 2003 14:48:34



> Is there any non MacOs/Nextstep/Openstep work being done using
> Objective C?

> Just curious,

Sure.  For example the NAR utility at http://nmhds.sourceforge.net
 
 
 

hello newbie calling

Post by Just » Mon, 23 Jun 2003 22:02:24




Quote:> I'm new to this newsgroup. I joined because I've finally
> succumbed to temptation and started programming Cocoa on my 1
> year old iBook. My background is in Unix (the reason I went for
> MacOS instead of a Windoze laptop) with C/C++ and more
> recently Python(yum!) and Java(yuk!).

You might be interested to know there's a bridge between Python and
Objective-C which allows you to write Cocoa apps in Python. See
http://pyobjc.sourceforge.net/ . It works very well.

Just

 
 
 

hello newbie calling

Post by Marcel Weih » Tue, 24 Jun 2003 05:24:51



>I'm new to this newsgroup. I joined because I've finally
>succumbed to temptation and started programming Cocoa on my 1
>year old iBook. My background is in Unix (the reason I went for
>MacOS instead of a Windoze laptop) with C/C++ and more
>recently Python(yum!) and Java(yuk!).

;-)

Quote:>Having read the posts over the last few days there are definitely
>a few Cocoa developers here but I wondered what else Objective C
>was being used for?

Lots of stuff.

Quote:>Is there any non MacOs/Nextstep/Openstep work being done using
>Objective C?

Yes.  I used to work for infopark (www.infopark.com) and we built
the content management system NPS + other stuff using GNUstep /
libFoundation on Solaris, with ports to various other *nix flavors
and NT.

Skyrix, www.skyrix.com is also heavily GNUstep based.  I am sure
there are many others, but most companies don't advertise the
fact...

Marcel

 
 
 

hello newbie calling

Post by Alan Gau » Tue, 24 Jun 2003 06:04:04



> > year old iBook. My background is in Unix (the reason I went for
> > MacOS instead of a Windoze laptop) with C/C++ and more
> > recently Python(yum!) and Java(yuk!).

> You might be interested to know there's a bridge between Python and
> Objective-C which allows you to write Cocoa apps in Python.

Yeah, I'd read about that and gave it a try but knowing nothing
about Cocoa, the effort of translating the docs was too much. I
figured if I learn native Cocoa first then I'll try the Python
method. Plus I read Brad Cox's book way back in 1990 and I
always wanted to try ObjC for real...

Thanks for all the answers folks,

Alan g.