GlobalPC's

GlobalPC's

Post by Ray Kopczyns » Sat, 14 Dec 2002 12:16:29



It will be interesting to see what these sell for...

Scroll towards bottom of the page -- a *bunch* of them!

If you have an interest (for historical artifacts, etc.) -- sign up and bid.
:-)

http://www.dovebid.com/auctions/browsewebcast.asp?Action=Move&AP=5&Au...
ID=1641&PP=50&SortBy=paddedinventoryid&SortDir=asc

Ray

 
 
 

GlobalPC's

Post by hyubs » Sat, 14 Dec 2002 15:52:22


the seller should be auctioning them on ebay unless the machines  are
intended for  wholesaling to a retailer..

i guess a school could get a lot of good work machines for little money.....


> It will be interesting to see what these sell for...

> Scroll towards bottom of the page -- a *bunch* of them!

> If you have an interest (for historical artifacts, etc.) -- sign up and bid.
> :-)

> http://www.dovebid.com/auctions/browsewebcast.asp?Action=Move&AP=5&Au...
> ID=1641&PP=50&SortBy=paddedinventoryid&SortDir=asc

> Ray


 
 
 

GlobalPC's

Post by Ray Kopczyns » Sat, 14 Dec 2002 23:33:20


<< the seller should be auctioning them on ebay unless the machines are
intended for  wholesaling to a retailer.. >>

Why? -- Any individual can sign up to bid on any of these items -- just like
eBay...

Ray

>Subject: Re: GlobalPC's

>Date: 12/12/02 10:52 PM Pacific Standard Time

>the seller should be auctioning them on ebay unless the machines  are
>intended for  wholesaling to a retailer..

>i guess a school could get a lot of good work machines for little money.....


>> It will be interesting to see what these sell for...

>> Scroll towards bottom of the page -- a *bunch* of them!

>> If you have an interest (for historical artifacts, etc.) -- sign up and
>bid.
>> :-)

>> http://www.dovebid.com/auctions/browsewebcast.asp?Action=Move&AP=5&Au...
>> ID=1641&PP=50&SortBy=paddedinventoryid&SortDir=asc

>> Ray

 
 
 

GlobalPC's

Post by Pat » Sun, 15 Dec 2002 01:16:02



Quote:> i guess a school could get a lot of good work machines for little

money.....

I have to laugh when clueless white people refer to "schools" as though they
were third world villages located in the jungle where the students walk
miles to a mud hut. Inside, a Global PC is running off electricity created
by a generator powered by dried cow dung.

Wake up Hyubso, smell the Chitlin. Schools don't want Global PC relics. The
only thing valuable in that pacjage is the keyboard's wrist pad.

 
 
 

GlobalPC's

Post by Bob » Sun, 15 Dec 2002 04:12:40





> > i guess a school could get a lot of good work machines for little
> money.....

> I have to laugh when clueless white people refer to "schools" as though
they
> were third world villages located in the jungle where the students walk
> miles to a mud hut. Inside, a Global PC is running off electricity created
> by a generator powered by dried cow dung.

> Wake up Hyubso, smell the Chitlin. Schools don't want Global PC relics.
The
> only thing valuable in that pacjage is the keyboard's wrist pad.

Yup.

--
Peace,

Bob

 
 
 

GlobalPC's

Post by hyubs » Sun, 15 Dec 2002 04:58:03


those machines would be fine for 5th and 6th graders.... i know, years
ago i supported a teacher friend of mine on his apple and win3x 486
computers which the kids used to write reports..  geos could do the same
work with less headache for the teacher

someone coudl probably buy 10 of those GPCs for the price of one new
windows headache box

..




>>i guess a school could get a lot of good work machines for little

> money.....

> I have to laugh when clueless white people refer to "schools" as though they
> were third world villages located in the jungle where the students walk
> miles to a mud hut. Inside, a Global PC is running off electricity created
> by a generator powered by dried cow dung.

> Wake up Hyubso, smell the Chitlin. Schools don't want Global PC relics. The
> only thing valuable in that pacjage is the keyboard's wrist pad.

 
 
 

GlobalPC's

Post by Bob » Sun, 15 Dec 2002 09:09:39


Honestly. School's would never consider GlobalPC's. Schools use very
high-end systems. Don't believe me? Go to your school district and talk to
em.

--
Peace,

Bob


> those machines would be fine for 5th and 6th graders.... i know, years
> ago i supported a teacher friend of mine on his apple and win3x 486
> computers which the kids used to write reports..  geos could do the same
> work with less headache for the teacher

> someone coudl probably buy 10 of those GPCs for the price of one new
> windows headache box

> ..




> >>i guess a school could get a lot of good work machines for little

> > money.....

> > I have to laugh when clueless white people refer to "schools" as though
they
> > were third world villages located in the jungle where the students walk
> > miles to a mud hut. Inside, a Global PC is running off electricity
created
> > by a generator powered by dried cow dung.

> > Wake up Hyubso, smell the Chitlin. Schools don't want Global PC relics.
The
> > only thing valuable in that pacjage is the keyboard's wrist pad.

 
 
 

GlobalPC's

Post by Pat » Sun, 15 Dec 2002 10:08:14


Honestly, Hyusbo, and you know I've been kidding you from time to time, but
it would be out of the ordinary for 5th and 6th graders to want a Global PC.
At school, the teachers and school administrators are given either a Mac or
a Windows PC because that's what is normally on the acquisition list. A
teacher doesn't just go out and buy a bunch of inexpensive computers, they
have to go through beaucratic channels. I suppose there might be exceptions
but its just the way things happen in the public sector. As a distributor,
you would get onto a biding list and when hardware or software comes up, you
simply anser the RFP. I've only seen PCs and Macs, Windows and Linux, and
sometimes a work station for engineering or classroom study and the big bids
can go for up to or over a million dollars with large screen teaching
monitors, LANs, Servers, et al. On the low end, its usually just PCs with
Windows and software thrown in. After that, its peripheral upgrades and
software upgrades, etc over the equipment lifecycle.


> those machines would be fine for 5th and 6th graders.... i know, years
> ago i supported a teacher friend of mine on his apple and win3x 486
> computers which the kids used to write reports..  geos could do the same
> work with less headache for the teacher

> someone coudl probably buy 10 of those GPCs for the price of one new
> windows headache box

> ..




> >>i guess a school could get a lot of good work machines for little

> > money.....

> > I have to laugh when clueless white people refer to "schools" as though
they
> > were third world villages located in the jungle where the students walk
> > miles to a mud hut. Inside, a Global PC is running off electricity
created
> > by a generator powered by dried cow dung.

> > Wake up Hyubso, smell the Chitlin. Schools don't want Global PC relics.
The
> > only thing valuable in that pacjage is the keyboard's wrist pad.

 
 
 

GlobalPC's

Post by Jens-Michael Gros » Mon, 16 Dec 2002 07:13:18


Bob schrieb:

Quote:

> Honestly. School's would never consider GlobalPC's. Schools use very
> high-end systems. Don't believe me? Go to your school district and talk to
> em.

Indeed they use. Approximately 0.1 to 0.33 per kid, depending on the
money the school has.
Even at the university, in computer science courses, I've never seen 1:1
computers to students.
Well, they still have the very same SUN workstations they had 8 years
ago. No local HD, 32MB Ram (8 MB back then) and one common BNC Ethernet
cable going to the server where all 10(!) machines boot from and swap
their memory to. But besides getting 32MB of Ram for them, I think there
is a second room now with another 10 machines. A 100% increase of
efficiency in the last 8 years. Wow! And now only two students have to
fight for a computer in their two hours of computer time per week.
But indeed, these are SUN workstations, no lousy GPCs :)

Grossibaer

--
Take a class. Read a book. Don't expect computers to be simple, because
they are not.

 
 
 

GlobalPC's

Post by hyubs » Mon, 16 Dec 2002 14:04:57


the teacher i supported bought all his appleIIs from me after i repaired
them..  then later he started buying old repaired  ibm clones   this was
before donating to schools became fashionable.  i laugh when i look back
at photos of his classroom full of apple IIs and later 386/486 ibm
compatibles.

now, you know what he taught his 5th + 6th grade kids?    file
management.. so they would know where their documents were stored on
either diskette or the hard drive,  and document creation using a word
processor.

i recall one pc had a cdrom drive to use one of those cdrom encyclopedias

this lucky teacher got written up in the paper (he gave me no credit,
unfortunately), got a big pay raise a few years later  adn was loved by
all his upper middle class kids' parents who thought their kids were way
ahead of the curve when it came ot getting a good computer education in
school.

no spreadsheets or internet or database or graphics design or digital
mp3 file swapping linux win nt xp crap.. just the very basics.. adn
those kids did not mind the slow 386+486 pcs they were using...

so the gobal pc would be fine for  a school, especially at the give away
price these will probably be sold at.. and if a school that could use
some good cheap pcs and misses out on them, well that  is just terrible.


> Honestly, Hyusbo, and you know I've been kidding you from time to time, but
> it would be out of the ordinary for 5th and 6th graders to want a Global PC.
> At school, the teachers and school administrators are given either a Mac or
> a Windows PC because that's what is normally on the acquisition list. A
> teacher doesn't just go out and buy a bunch of inexpensive computers, they
> have to go through beaucratic channels. I suppose there might be exceptions
> but its just the way things happen in the public sector. As a distributor,
> you would get onto a biding list and when hardware or software comes up, you
> simply anser the RFP. I've only seen PCs and Macs, Windows and Linux, and
> sometimes a work station for engineering or classroom study and the big bids
> can go for up to or over a million dollars with large screen teaching
> monitors, LANs, Servers, et al. On the low end, its usually just PCs with
> Windows and software thrown in. After that, its peripheral upgrades and
> software upgrades, etc over the equipment lifecycle.



>>those machines would be fine for 5th and 6th graders.... i know, years
>>ago i supported a teacher friend of mine on his apple and win3x 486
>>computers which the kids used to write reports..  geos could do the same
>>work with less headache for the teacher

>>someone coudl probably buy 10 of those GPCs for the price of one new
>>windows headache box

>>..




>>>>i guess a school could get a lot of good work machines for little

>>>money.....

>>>I have to laugh when clueless white people refer to "schools" as though

> they

>>>were third world villages located in the jungle where the students walk
>>>miles to a mud hut. Inside, a Global PC is running off electricity

> created

>>>by a generator powered by dried cow dung.

>>>Wake up Hyubso, smell the Chitlin. Schools don't want Global PC relics.

> The

>>>only thing valuable in that pacjage is the keyboard's wrist pad.

 
 
 

GlobalPC's

Post by Pat » Tue, 17 Dec 2002 01:10:41


First, let me wipe the tears from my eyes.

So now these kids are supposed to be better off because they were not
exposed to mainstream computing??? The teacher should have been scolded for
being a loose canon. Thank God this story is an exception.


> the teacher i supported bought all his appleIIs from me after i repaired
> them..  then later he started buying old repaired  ibm clones   this was
> before donating to schools became fashionable.  i laugh when i look back
> at photos of his classroom full of apple IIs and later 386/486 ibm
> compatibles.

> now, you know what he taught his 5th + 6th grade kids?    file
> management.. so they would know where their documents were stored on
> either diskette or the hard drive,  and document creation using a word
> processor.

> i recall one pc had a cdrom drive to use one of those cdrom encyclopedias

> this lucky teacher got written up in the paper (he gave me no credit,
> unfortunately), got a big pay raise a few years later  adn was loved by
> all his upper middle class kids' parents who thought their kids were way
> ahead of the curve when it came ot getting a good computer education in
> school.

> no spreadsheets or internet or database or graphics design or digital
> mp3 file swapping linux win nt xp crap.. just the very basics.. adn
> those kids did not mind the slow 386+486 pcs they were using...

> so the gobal pc would be fine for  a school, especially at the give away
> price these will probably be sold at.. and if a school that could use
> some good cheap pcs and misses out on them, well that  is just terrible.


> > Honestly, Hyusbo, and you know I've been kidding you from time to time,
but
> > it would be out of the ordinary for 5th and 6th graders to want a Global
PC.
> > At school, the teachers and school administrators are given either a Mac
or
> > a Windows PC because that's what is normally on the acquisition list. A
> > teacher doesn't just go out and buy a bunch of inexpensive computers,
they
> > have to go through beaucratic channels. I suppose there might be
exceptions
> > but its just the way things happen in the public sector. As a
distributor,
> > you would get onto a biding list and when hardware or software comes up,
you
> > simply anser the RFP. I've only seen PCs and Macs, Windows and Linux,
and
> > sometimes a work station for engineering or classroom study and the big
bids
> > can go for up to or over a million dollars with large screen teaching
> > monitors, LANs, Servers, et al. On the low end, its usually just PCs
with
> > Windows and software thrown in. After that, its peripheral upgrades and
> > software upgrades, etc over the equipment lifecycle.



> >>those machines would be fine for 5th and 6th graders.... i know, years
> >>ago i supported a teacher friend of mine on his apple and win3x 486
> >>computers which the kids used to write reports..  geos could do the same
> >>work with less headache for the teacher

> >>someone coudl probably buy 10 of those GPCs for the price of one new
> >>windows headache box

> >>..




> >>>>i guess a school could get a lot of good work machines for little

> >>>money.....

> >>>I have to laugh when clueless white people refer to "schools" as though

> > they

> >>>were third world villages located in the jungle where the students walk
> >>>miles to a mud hut. Inside, a Global PC is running off electricity

> > created

> >>>by a generator powered by dried cow dung.

> >>>Wake up Hyubso, smell the Chitlin. Schools don't want Global PC relics.

> > The

> >>>only thing valuable in that pacjage is the keyboard's wrist pad.

 
 
 

GlobalPC's

Post by Steve Ma » Tue, 17 Dec 2002 08:29:00


Quote:>> now, you know what he taught his 5th + 6th grade kids?    file
>> management.. so they would know where their documents were stored on
>> either diskette or the hard drive,  and document creation using a word
>> processor.

Not a very good argument if you are trying to promote
the use of a Global PC in schools... seeing as how the
Global PC attempts to hide all file management from the user.

Steve

-----
"There are only two ways to live your life.
One is as though nothing is a miracle.
The other is as though everything is a miracle. "
-- Albert Einstein
-----

 
 
 

GlobalPC's

Post by Viktor Man » Thu, 19 Dec 2002 03:12:14



Quote:>It will be interesting to see what these sell for...

>Scroll towards bottom of the page -- a *bunch* of them!

Some two hundred....wow....

They've set the starting bid to $40/ea. If they get rid of all of
them, it's $8k for a truckload of s*at least. Not bad, eh?
Maybe the Smithsonian will bid for one or two of them ;-)

Does anybody here know what the original street price for the GlobalPC
was?

And how many might have been sold by that time, or are still in the
field?

Viktor

 
 
 

GlobalPC's

Post by Pat » Thu, 19 Dec 2002 07:26:33



Quote:> They've set the starting bid to $40/ea. If they get rid of all of
> them, it's $8k for a truckload of s*at least. Not bad, eh?
> Maybe the Smithsonian will bid for one or two of them ;-)

Viktor,

The Smithsonian lacks the vision to comprehend the cultural impact of the
Global PC on society. It belongs here:

http://www.veryComputer.com/

 
 
 

GlobalPC's

Post by Viktor Man » Thu, 19 Dec 2002 08:09:55



GMT:

Quote:>The Smithsonian lacks the vision to comprehend the cultural impact of the
>Global PC on society. It belongs here:

>http://www.glyphs.com/moba/

[.....shudder]

Hi Pat,

Well, I've been to the Smithsonian only once, coupla years ago (I'm
not a US citizen) but was so impressed by the stuff they've got over
there.

In particular, I noticed an UNDERWOOD typewriter, m'factured in 1926.

The same model, built in 1925,  I saw at a friend's office down there
in Argentina, some two years ago. That old rig is still in use, ever
going strong, and probably will be until the end of time. It's
employed mo thru fri, 8 thru 5, and sometimes even on weekends.

So I've to correct myself: The Smithsonian seems to know what items
are worth to be collected for eternity.
 (Don't they even have a '58 Edsel down there? - Can't remember.)

So, if they submit a bid for a GlobalPC, I'll know it does mean
s'thing. Stay alert, boys!

Viktor