kermit programs

kermit programs

Post by Matthew A. Topin » Sat, 29 May 1993 11:56:59



Hello again,

I am looking for some info on IBM kermit programs.  I wanted to ask
about it here first since it relates to the 8-bit Kermit program.  I have been
ablto download software from the ATARI ARCHIVES using one of the version
of Kert.  TO wnload, I have to access a Gopher Server, FTP to the archives and finally get to the directory/ files I need.  The settings on kermit have to be: parity even, file-type binary, word size seven, and eig-bit-quoting on.
I have tried to download the same way on a PCusing MS-Kermit but I have
been unsuccessful since there is no eight-bit-quoting.  AT esent, this method along with the BART mailer are the two methods of receiving les
I have available.  I should say again that I have been successful downloading
thru a gopher server using the 8-bit kermit programs buecause of the fact they allow
this eight-bit-quoting.  What is eight-bit-quoting anyway?  I have not gotten
any real answers when I asked people strickly in the PC world.

Any help would greatly be appreciated.
--

 
 
 

kermit programs

Post by Winston Smi » Thu, 03 Jun 1993 17:18:15


On Friday, May 28, 1993 at 02:56:59 GMT,

 MT> To download, I have to access a Gopher Server, FTP to
 MT> the archives, and finally get to the directory/files
 MT> I need.  The settings on Kermit have to be:
 MT>
 MT>      Parity Even, File-type Binary, Word Size Seven,
 MT>      and Eight-Bit-Quoting ON.
 MT>
 MT> I have tried to download the same way on a PC, using MS-Kermit,
 MT> but I have been unsuccessful, since there is no eight-bit-quoting.
 MT> At present, this method, along with the BART mailer, are the
 MT> two methods of receiving files I have available.  I should say again
 MT> that I have been successfully downloading through a Gopher Server
 MT> using the 8-bit Kermit programs because of the fact they allow
 MT> this eight-bit-quoting.
 MT>
 MT> What is eight-bit-quoting anyway?  I have not gotten any
 MT> real answers when I asked people strickly in the PC world.
 MT>
 MT> Any help would greatly be appreciated.

     "Eight-Bit-Quoting" is a method of sending an 8-Bit byte along a data
pathway that it only 7 Bits wide.  It works by sending what is called a
"Quote Character" which tells the Kermit on the other side that the next
byte is not actually a character, but "some bits left over" which should be
combined with the 7-Bits of the byte sent before the quote character was
sent.  It essentially works the same way that the UUENCODE program works.

     What this means essentially is that somewhere along your data pathway
of machines transmitting your data is a machine that is probably
communicating with a data word of SEVEN-EVEN-TWO, that is a 7-Bit wordsize
(a.k.a. low ASCII or "regular" ASCII), EVEN parity, and TWO stop bits.  A
7-Bit wide data pathway is considered "ancient" by today's standards,
however that was the one main purpose that Kermit was written, namely, to
transmit code successfully through these 7-bit wide data bottlenecks.  A
Kermit that does not allow for Eight-Bit-Quoting is absolutely meaningless!
The whole --PURPOSE-- behind the writing of Kermit was to allow for 8-Bit
quoting!  You have an ancient machine or an old 7-Bit cable somewhere along
the mailer pathways from the archives to your local host.

     (By the way, besides using KERMIT, something else you could try is
setting up XMODEM to emulate 7-Bit wide CP/M Ward Christensen XMODEM, which
is known as MODEM-7 emulation.  Some versions of XMODEM still provide for
this 7-Bit CP/M format.  You may be able to get around your 7-Bit wide data
bottleneck by using MODEM-7, provided that the local and remote machines
can still handle the format.  Good Luck!)